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Title: U.S./Russian collaboration in high-energy-density physics using high-explosive pulsed power: Ultrahigh current experiments, ultrahigh magnetic field applications, and progress toward controlled thermonuclear fusion

Abstract

A collaboration has been established between the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In 1992, when emerging governmental policy in the US and Russia began to encourage lab-to-lab interactions, the two institutes quickly recognized a common interest in the technology and applications of magnetic flux compression, the technique for converting the chemical energy released by high-explosives into intense electrical pulses and intensely concentrated magnetic energy. In a period of just over three years, the two institutes have performed more than fifteen joint experiments covering research areas ranging from basic pulsed power technology to solid-state physics to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Using magnetic flux compression generators, electrical currents ranging from 20 to 100 MA were delivered to loads of interest in high-energy-density physics. A 20-MA pulse was delivered to an imploding liner load with a 10--90% rise time of 0.7 {micro}s. A new, high-energy concept for soft X-ray generation was tested at 65 MA. More than 20 MJ of implosion kinetic energy was delivered to a condensed matter imploding liner by a 100-MA current pulse. Magnetic flux compressors were used to determine the upper critical field of a high-temperature superconductor and to createmore » pressure high enough that the transition from single particle behavior to quasimolecular behavior was observed in solid argon. A major step was taken toward the achievement of controlled thermonuclear fusion by a relatively unexplored approach known in Russia as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) and in the US as MTF (Magnetized Target Fusion). Many of the characteristics of a target plasma that produced 10{sup 13} fusion neutrons have been evaluated. Computational models of the target plasma suggest that the plasma is suitable for subsequent compression to fusion conditions by an imploding pusher.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
  2. All-Russian Scientific Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
596752
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: PBD: Dec 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION; 07 ISOTOPE AND RADIATION SOURCE TECHNOLOGY; 66 PHYSICS; THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; X-RAY SOURCES; SOLID STATE PHYSICS; INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION; RUSSIAN FEDERATION; USA; POWER SUPPLIES; MAGNETIC COMPRESSION; MAGNETIC FIELDS; ELECTRIC FIELDS

Citation Formats

Lindemuth, I R, Ekdahl, C A, Fowler, C M, Reinovsky, R E, Younger, S M, Chernyshev, V K, Mokhov, V N, and Pavlovskii, A I. U.S./Russian collaboration in high-energy-density physics using high-explosive pulsed power: Ultrahigh current experiments, ultrahigh magnetic field applications, and progress toward controlled thermonuclear fusion. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.1109/27.650905.
Lindemuth, I R, Ekdahl, C A, Fowler, C M, Reinovsky, R E, Younger, S M, Chernyshev, V K, Mokhov, V N, & Pavlovskii, A I. U.S./Russian collaboration in high-energy-density physics using high-explosive pulsed power: Ultrahigh current experiments, ultrahigh magnetic field applications, and progress toward controlled thermonuclear fusion. United States. doi:10.1109/27.650905.
Lindemuth, I R, Ekdahl, C A, Fowler, C M, Reinovsky, R E, Younger, S M, Chernyshev, V K, Mokhov, V N, and Pavlovskii, A I. Mon . "U.S./Russian collaboration in high-energy-density physics using high-explosive pulsed power: Ultrahigh current experiments, ultrahigh magnetic field applications, and progress toward controlled thermonuclear fusion". United States. doi:10.1109/27.650905.
@article{osti_596752,
title = {U.S./Russian collaboration in high-energy-density physics using high-explosive pulsed power: Ultrahigh current experiments, ultrahigh magnetic field applications, and progress toward controlled thermonuclear fusion},
author = {Lindemuth, I R and Ekdahl, C A and Fowler, C M and Reinovsky, R E and Younger, S M and Chernyshev, V K and Mokhov, V N and Pavlovskii, A I},
abstractNote = {A collaboration has been established between the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In 1992, when emerging governmental policy in the US and Russia began to encourage lab-to-lab interactions, the two institutes quickly recognized a common interest in the technology and applications of magnetic flux compression, the technique for converting the chemical energy released by high-explosives into intense electrical pulses and intensely concentrated magnetic energy. In a period of just over three years, the two institutes have performed more than fifteen joint experiments covering research areas ranging from basic pulsed power technology to solid-state physics to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Using magnetic flux compression generators, electrical currents ranging from 20 to 100 MA were delivered to loads of interest in high-energy-density physics. A 20-MA pulse was delivered to an imploding liner load with a 10--90% rise time of 0.7 {micro}s. A new, high-energy concept for soft X-ray generation was tested at 65 MA. More than 20 MJ of implosion kinetic energy was delivered to a condensed matter imploding liner by a 100-MA current pulse. Magnetic flux compressors were used to determine the upper critical field of a high-temperature superconductor and to create pressure high enough that the transition from single particle behavior to quasimolecular behavior was observed in solid argon. A major step was taken toward the achievement of controlled thermonuclear fusion by a relatively unexplored approach known in Russia as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) and in the US as MTF (Magnetized Target Fusion). Many of the characteristics of a target plasma that produced 10{sup 13} fusion neutrons have been evaluated. Computational models of the target plasma suggest that the plasma is suitable for subsequent compression to fusion conditions by an imploding pusher.},
doi = {10.1109/27.650905},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science},
number = 6,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {12}
}