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Title: Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 1: Executive summary

Abstract

On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Inst., Balboa (Panama)
OSTI Identifier:
5964763
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5964763
Report Number(s):
PB-92-117910/XAB
CNN: DI-14-12-0001-30393
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: See also Volume 2, PB92-117928. Sponsored by Minerals Management Service, Metairie, LA. Gulf of Mexico OCS Regional Office
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; OIL SPILLS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; PANAMA; ALGAE; BIOLOGICAL RECOVERY; CLEANING; ECOLOGY; INVERTEBRATES; LABORATORIES; MONITORING; REEFS; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; ANIMALS; CENTRAL AMERICA; CONTROL; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; LATIN AMERICA; PLANTS; POLLUTION CONTROL; RECOVERY 020900* -- Petroleum-- Environmental Aspects; 540320 -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 540220 -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 560300 -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Keller, B.D., and Jackson, J.B.C. Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 1: Executive summary. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Keller, B.D., & Jackson, J.B.C. Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 1: Executive summary. United States.
Keller, B.D., and Jackson, J.B.C. Tue . "Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 1: Executive summary". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5964763,
title = {Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 1: Executive summary},
author = {Keller, B.D. and Jackson, J.B.C.},
abstractNote = {On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1991},
month = {Tue Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1991}
}

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  • On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and tomore » monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.« less
  • The anticipated development and production of significant oil reserves in the area generated the need to develop baseline information on the biological, chemical, and geological characteristics of the area. A survey of soft-bottom habitats was conducted at 107 stations along 16 transects, with bottom depths ranging from 165 to 3000 feet. A total of 142 sediment (box) cores were collected for analysis of benthic infauna, total organic carbon, petroleum hydrocarbons, chromium, barium and various sediment parameters. Selected hard-bottom areas were surveyed using a manned submersible along 23 transects over bottom depths of 180 to 790 feet. Hard-bottom assemblages are expectedmore » to be more sensitive than soft-bottom assemblages to impacts from oil and gas operations.« less
  • This volume contains a summary of findings of a two year (1980-1982) study on the behavior of seabirds encountering oil-contaminated water. An information survey, undertaken in the study, indicated that out of nearly 300 references to seabird/oil research only 12 articles addressed the topic of seabird behavior in the presence of oil. Available evidence does, however, indicate that seabirds avoid or try to avoid making contact with petroleum oil. Field observations and experiments conducted in the study areas of natural oil seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel California, revealed that: (1) abundance of seabirds in the study area was relativelymore » low when compared to that in oil-free areas of the Channel; (2) the age and/or the residency status of Brown Pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis), Western Gulls (Larus occidentalis) and Heermann's Gulls (Larus heermanni) were related to the frequency of interaction of these birds with oil.« less
  • This report provides the basis for a utility to investigate the benefits of purchasing volume reduction equipment. The work includes the establishment of a volume reduction data base, the creation of the volume reduction cost analysis computer program VRTECH, and a generic analysis designed to identify the major factors influencing the economics of the various equipment options. The results are presented in five volumes. Volume 1 serves as an executive summary. The second volume describes the VRTECH code and presents the results of the generic economic analysis. The work shows that rad-waste generation rates and future burial price increases aremore » the key factors in assessing the economic value of volume reduction. Volume 3 describes several volume reduction equipment options in great detail. General arrangement drawings for generic installation are included and serve as the basis for cost estimates for the installed equipment. Volume 4 establishes pricing levels at new shallow land burial grounds. These last two volumes form the volume reduction data bases. Volume 5 is limited to a presentation of the computer results for the VRTECH economic analysis. It is on microfiche and can be found in the inside back pocket of Volume 2.« less
  • The Interim Assessment presents the state of the science in each Task Group subject area based largely on the NAPAP research but taking into account relevant research done elsewhere in the United States and abroad. The Interim Assessment focuses on the reduction in scientific uncertainties that have been accomplished by this research since 1982 and describes the effort toward further resolution of most of the major remaining uncertainties by 1990, the end of the program. Preliminary evaluation of possible economic impacts of acidic deposition has been attempted, but the lack of quantifiable effects constrains the assessment. An effort was mademore » in 1985 to prepare an initial assessment, which was reworked in 1986 and 1987 into the Interim Assessment when it was realized that a large body of new scientific information was flowing in from NAPAP so that a more solidly based assessment could be made. 17 figs.« less