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Title: Patching genes to fight disease

Abstract

The National Institutes of Health has approved the first gene therapy experiments, one of which will try to cure cancer by bolstering the immune system. The applications of such therapy are limited, but the potential aid to people with genetic diseases is great.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5945655
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Insight; (USA); Journal Volume: 6:36
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; GENE MUTATIONS; THERAPY; HEREDITARY DISEASES; GENETIC ENGINEERING; ADA; AIDS; GENE RECOMBINATION; GENE REGULATION; HEMOPHILIA; IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES; IMMUNOTHERAPY; LYMPHOCYTES; MELANOMAS; ANIMAL CELLS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY FLUIDS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DISEASES; HEMIC DISEASES; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; LEUKOCYTES; MATERIALS; MUTATIONS; NEOPLASMS; PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES; SOMATIC CELLS; VIRAL DISEASES 550400* -- Genetics

Citation Formats

Holzman, D. Patching genes to fight disease. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Holzman, D. Patching genes to fight disease. United States.
Holzman, D. 1990. "Patching genes to fight disease". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5945655,
title = {Patching genes to fight disease},
author = {Holzman, D.},
abstractNote = {The National Institutes of Health has approved the first gene therapy experiments, one of which will try to cure cancer by bolstering the immune system. The applications of such therapy are limited, but the potential aid to people with genetic diseases is great.},
doi = {},
journal = {Insight; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 6:36,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 9
}
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