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Title: Antarctica - operating conditions and petroleum prospects

Abstract

With an area of 5.48 million mi/sup 2/, Antarctica is only slightly smaller than South America and rests upon the world's deepest continental shelf. The Transantarctic Mountains separate East Antarctica - a high ice-covered plateau - from West Antarctica, an archipelago of mountainous islands covered and bonded by ice. The average thickness of the 1.16 million mi/sup 3/ ice sheet that covers 95% of the continent is about 6600 ft. The geologic structure consists of six tectonic units. Economic feasibility is the critical factor affecting the development and transport of Antarctica's ice-covered hydrocarbon reserves. Comparisons with other southern Gondwanaland continents suggest that any hydrocarbons found are likely to be moderate in size, not the supergiant fields needed to justify commercial exploitation.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5943882
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oil Gas J.; (United States); Journal Volume: 78
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 02 PETROLEUM; ANTARCTICA; NATURAL GAS DEPOSITS; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; EXPLORATION; GEOLOGY; TECTONICS; ANTARCTIC REGIONS; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; MINERAL RESOURCES; POLAR REGIONS; RESOURCES 030200* -- Natural Gas-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration; 020200 -- Petroleum-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Ivanhoe, L.F.. Antarctica - operating conditions and petroleum prospects. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Ivanhoe, L.F.. Antarctica - operating conditions and petroleum prospects. United States.
Ivanhoe, L.F.. 1980. "Antarctica - operating conditions and petroleum prospects". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5943882,
title = {Antarctica - operating conditions and petroleum prospects},
author = {Ivanhoe, L.F.},
abstractNote = {With an area of 5.48 million mi/sup 2/, Antarctica is only slightly smaller than South America and rests upon the world's deepest continental shelf. The Transantarctic Mountains separate East Antarctica - a high ice-covered plateau - from West Antarctica, an archipelago of mountainous islands covered and bonded by ice. The average thickness of the 1.16 million mi/sup 3/ ice sheet that covers 95% of the continent is about 6600 ft. The geologic structure consists of six tectonic units. Economic feasibility is the critical factor affecting the development and transport of Antarctica's ice-covered hydrocarbon reserves. Comparisons with other southern Gondwanaland continents suggest that any hydrocarbons found are likely to be moderate in size, not the supergiant fields needed to justify commercial exploitation.},
doi = {},
journal = {Oil Gas J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month =
}
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