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Title: Spent fuel assembly hardware: Characterization and 10 CFR 61 classification for waste disposal: Volume 1, Activation measurements and comparison with calculations for spent fuel assembly hardware

Abstract

Consolidation of spent fuel is under active consideration as the US Department of Energy plans to dispose of spent fuel. During consolidation, the fuel pins are removed from an intact fuel assembly and repackaged into a more compact configuration. After repackaging, approximately 30 kg of residual spent fuel assembly hardware per assembly remains that is also radioactive and requires disposal. Understanding the nature of this secondary waste stream is critical to designing a system that will properly handle, package, store, and dispose of the waste. This report presents a methodology for estimating the radionuclide inventory in irradiated spent fuel hardware. Ratios are developed that allow the use of ORIGEN2 computer code calculations to be applied to regions that are outside the fueled region. The ratios are based on the analysis of samples of irradiated hardware from spent fuel assemblies. The results of this research are presented in three volumes. In Volume 1, the development of scaling factors that can be used with ORIGEN2 calculations to estimate activation of spent fuel assembly hardware is documented. The results from laboratory analysis of irradiated spent-fuel hardware samples are also presented in Volume 1. In Volumes 2 and 3, the calculated flux profiles ofmore » spent nuclear fuel assemblies are presented for pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors, respectively. The results presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were used to develop the scaling factors documented in Volume 1. 5 refs., 4 figs., 21 tabs.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5940840
Report Number(s):
PNL-6906-Vol.1
ON: DE89015190
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; CLASSIFICATION; SPENT FUEL ELEMENTS; PACKAGING; INVENTORIES; OPTIMIZATION; SPENT FUELS; VOLUME; ENERGY SOURCES; FUEL ELEMENTS; FUELS; MATERIALS; NUCLEAR FUELS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; REACTOR COMPONENTS; REACTOR MATERIALS; WASTES; 420204* - Engineering- Shipping Containers; 052002 - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Disposal & Storage; 053000 - Nuclear Fuels- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Luksic, A. Spent fuel assembly hardware: Characterization and 10 CFR 61 classification for waste disposal: Volume 1, Activation measurements and comparison with calculations for spent fuel assembly hardware. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.2172/5940840.
Luksic, A. Spent fuel assembly hardware: Characterization and 10 CFR 61 classification for waste disposal: Volume 1, Activation measurements and comparison with calculations for spent fuel assembly hardware. United States. doi:10.2172/5940840.
Luksic, A. Thu . "Spent fuel assembly hardware: Characterization and 10 CFR 61 classification for waste disposal: Volume 1, Activation measurements and comparison with calculations for spent fuel assembly hardware". United States. doi:10.2172/5940840. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5940840.
@article{osti_5940840,
title = {Spent fuel assembly hardware: Characterization and 10 CFR 61 classification for waste disposal: Volume 1, Activation measurements and comparison with calculations for spent fuel assembly hardware},
author = {Luksic, A.},
abstractNote = {Consolidation of spent fuel is under active consideration as the US Department of Energy plans to dispose of spent fuel. During consolidation, the fuel pins are removed from an intact fuel assembly and repackaged into a more compact configuration. After repackaging, approximately 30 kg of residual spent fuel assembly hardware per assembly remains that is also radioactive and requires disposal. Understanding the nature of this secondary waste stream is critical to designing a system that will properly handle, package, store, and dispose of the waste. This report presents a methodology for estimating the radionuclide inventory in irradiated spent fuel hardware. Ratios are developed that allow the use of ORIGEN2 computer code calculations to be applied to regions that are outside the fueled region. The ratios are based on the analysis of samples of irradiated hardware from spent fuel assemblies. The results of this research are presented in three volumes. In Volume 1, the development of scaling factors that can be used with ORIGEN2 calculations to estimate activation of spent fuel assembly hardware is documented. The results from laboratory analysis of irradiated spent-fuel hardware samples are also presented in Volume 1. In Volumes 2 and 3, the calculated flux profiles of spent nuclear fuel assemblies are presented for pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors, respectively. The results presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were used to develop the scaling factors documented in Volume 1. 5 refs., 4 figs., 21 tabs.},
doi = {10.2172/5940840},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1989},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1989}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Consolidation of spent fuel is under active consideration as the US Department of Energy plans to dispose of spent fuel as required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During consolidation, the fuel pins are removed from an intact fuel assembly and repackaged into a more compact configuration. After repackaging, approximately 30 kg of residual spent fuel assembly hardware per assembly that is also radioactive and required disposal. Understanding the nature of this secondary waste stream is critical to designing a system that will properly handle, package, store, and dispose of the waste. This report presents a methodology formore » estimating the radionuclide inventory in irradiated spent fuel hardware. Ratios are developed that allow the use of ORIGEN2 computer code calculations to be applied to regions that are outside the fueled region. The ratios are based on the analysis of samples of irradiated hardware from spent fuel assemblies. The results of this research are presented in three volumes. In Volume 1, the development of scaling factors that can be used with ORIGEN2 calculations to estimate activation of spent fuel assembly hardware is documented. The results from laboratory analysis of irradiated spent-fuel hardware samples are also presented in Volume 1. In Volume 2 and 3, the calculated flux profiles of spent nuclear fuel assemblies are presented for pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors, respectively. The results presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were used to develop the scaling factors documented in Volume 1.« less
  • Consolidation of spent fuel is under active consideration as the US Department of Energy plans to dispose of spent fuel as required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During consolidation, the fuel pins are removed from an intact fuel assembly and repackaged into a more compact configuration. After repackaging, approximately 30 kg of residual spent fuel assembly hardware per assembly remains that is also radioactive and requires disposal. Understanding the nature of this secondary waste stream is critical to designing a system that will properly handle, package, store, and dispose of the waste. This report present a methodologymore » for estimating the radionuclide inventory in irradiated spent fuel hardware. Ratios are developed that allow the use of ORIGEN2 computer code calculations to be applied to regions that are outside the fueled region. The ratios are based on the analysis of samples of irradiated hardware from spent fuel assemblies. The results of this research are presented in three volumes. In Volume 1, the development of scaling factors that can be used with ORIGEN2 calculations to estimate activation of spent fuel assembly hardware is documented. The results from Laboratory analysis of irradiated spent-fuel hardware samples are also presented in Volume 1. In Volumes 2 and 3, the calculated flux profiles of spent nuclear fuel assemblies are presented for pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors, respectively. The results presented in Volumes 2 and 3 were used to develop the scaling factors documented in Volume 1.« less
  • This document reports the results of laboratory radionuclide measurements on a representative group of non-fuel assembly (NFA) components for the purposes of waste classification. This document also provides a methodology to estimate the radionuclide inventory of NFA components, including those located outside the fueled region of a nuclear reactor. These radionuclide estimates can then be used to determine the waste classification of NFA components for which there are no physical measurements. Previously, few radionuclide inventory measurements had been performed on NFA components. For this project, recommended scaling factors were selected for the ORIGEN2 computer code that result in conservative estimatesmore » of radionuclide concentrations in NFA components. These scaling factors were based upon experimental data obtained from the following NFA components: (1) a pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnable poison rod assembly, (2) a PVM rod cluster control assembly, and (3) a boiling water reactor cruciform control rod blade. As a whole, these components were found to be within Class C limits. Laboratory radionuclide measurements for these components are provided in detail.« less
  • There are a variety of wastes that will be disposed of by the federal waste management system under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The primary waste form is spent nuclear fuel. Currently, this is in the form of fuel assemblies. If the fuel pins are removed from the fuel assembly, as in consolidation, then the fuel pins and the structural portion of the fuel assembly must be considered as separate waste streams. The structural hardware consists of end fittings, grid spacers, water rods (BWR 8 x 8 only), control rod guide tubes (PWR only) and various nuts, washers,more » springs, etc. These are referred to as spent fuel disassembly (SFD) hardware. There will also be a number of other components which are defined in Appendix E of 10 CFR 961, the standard utility contract. These are referred to as nonfuel-bearing (NFB) components, and include fuel channels (BWR), control rods, fission chambers, neutron sources, thimble plugs, and other components. This paper characterizes spent fuel disassembly (SFD) hardware, and nonfuel-bearing (NFB) components for the most abundant fuel types. The descriptions and figures given are representative for the items described. Many subvariants exist due to design evaluation, which are not covered. This paper also discusses the relationship of these wastes to 10 CFR 61 waste classification.« less
  • This study is providing the NRC and licensees with a more comprehensive and defensible data base and regulatory assessment of the radiological factors associated with reactor decommissioning and disposal of wastes generated during these activities. The objectives of this study are being accomplished during a two-phase sampling, measurement, and assessment program involving the actual decommissioning of Shippingport Station and the detailed analysis of neutron-activated materials from commercial reactors. Radiological characterization studies at Shippingport have shown that neutron activation products, dominated by {sup 60}Co, comprised the residual radionuclide inventory. Fission products and transuranic radionuclides were essentially absent. Waste classification assessments havemore » shown that all decommissioning materials (except reactor pressure vessel internals) could be disposed of as Class A waste. Measurements and assessments of spent fuel assembly hardware have shown that {sup 63}Ni, {sup 59}Ni, and {sup 94}Nb sometimes greatly exceed the 10CFR61 Class C limit for some components, and thus would require disposal in a high level waste repository. These measurements are providing the basis for an assessment of the disposal options for these types of highly radioactive materials. Comparisons of predicted (calculated) activation product concentrations with the empirical data are providing as assessment of the accuracy of calculational methods. Work is continuing on radiological characterization of spent PWR and BWR control rod assemblies. Additional work is planned on current issues/problems relating to reactor decommissioning. These efforts will be reported on in future supplements to this report. 20 refs., 23 figs., 34 tabs.« less