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Title: Hydrologic effects of climate change in the Delaware River Basin, by Gregory J. McCabe, Jr. and Mark A. Ayers

Abstract

Water resource scientists, planners, and managers need to know what hydrology changes to expect due to CO{sub 2}-induced climate warming. McCabe and Ayer's study is a useful first-cut approximation of how climate change might affect seasonal soil moisture and runoff in the Delaware River basin. However, I question that the findings of this study are in agreement with those obtained in other climate-change studies. The change in runoff agree in direction, but the magnitudes differ according to region. Ayers estimated that unless precipitation increases, climate warming will cause a decrease in runoff. Will the effect of increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} on reduced transpiration rates be a major factor influencing runoff That depends on seasonal distribution of precipitation and distribution and quantity of transpiring vegetation. The effect of CO{sub 2}-induced climate warming on watershed hydrology will be complex. Runoff changes may result from several competing factors including: warmer temperatures, changes in quantity and seasonal distribution of precipitation, changes in cloudiness, windiness, and humidity, changes in soil wetness, increased length of the growing season, increased transpiration leaf area, increased leaf temperatures, species changes in vegetation communities, increased plant water used efficiency, decreased stomatal conductance and decreased stomate density due to increased CO{submore » 2}.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Idaho, Moscow (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5935761
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Water Resources Bulletin; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 26:5; Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1370
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; CLIMATES; VARIATIONS; DELAWARE RIVER; HYDROLOGY; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; CLOUDS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; RUNOFF; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; TRANSPIRATION; WIND; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CLIMATIC CHANGE; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; MASS TRANSFER; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; RIVERS; STREAMS; SURFACE WATERS; 540120* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 540310 - Environment, Aquatic- Basic Studies- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Verbyla, D L. Hydrologic effects of climate change in the Delaware River Basin, by Gregory J. McCabe, Jr. and Mark A. Ayers. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Verbyla, D L. Hydrologic effects of climate change in the Delaware River Basin, by Gregory J. McCabe, Jr. and Mark A. Ayers. United States.
Verbyla, D L. Mon . "Hydrologic effects of climate change in the Delaware River Basin, by Gregory J. McCabe, Jr. and Mark A. Ayers". United States.
@article{osti_5935761,
title = {Hydrologic effects of climate change in the Delaware River Basin, by Gregory J. McCabe, Jr. and Mark A. Ayers},
author = {Verbyla, D L},
abstractNote = {Water resource scientists, planners, and managers need to know what hydrology changes to expect due to CO{sub 2}-induced climate warming. McCabe and Ayer's study is a useful first-cut approximation of how climate change might affect seasonal soil moisture and runoff in the Delaware River basin. However, I question that the findings of this study are in agreement with those obtained in other climate-change studies. The change in runoff agree in direction, but the magnitudes differ according to region. Ayers estimated that unless precipitation increases, climate warming will cause a decrease in runoff. Will the effect of increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} on reduced transpiration rates be a major factor influencing runoff That depends on seasonal distribution of precipitation and distribution and quantity of transpiring vegetation. The effect of CO{sub 2}-induced climate warming on watershed hydrology will be complex. Runoff changes may result from several competing factors including: warmer temperatures, changes in quantity and seasonal distribution of precipitation, changes in cloudiness, windiness, and humidity, changes in soil wetness, increased length of the growing season, increased transpiration leaf area, increased leaf temperatures, species changes in vegetation communities, increased plant water used efficiency, decreased stomatal conductance and decreased stomate density due to increased CO{sub 2}.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5935761}, journal = {Water Resources Bulletin; (United States)},
issn = {0043-1370},
number = ,
volume = 26:5,
place = {United States},
year = {1990},
month = {10}
}