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Title: Energy and civilization

Abstract

The author challenges the validity of linking energy consumption and civilization levels and suggests that it might be wise to discard the equation. Variations in how individuals choose to use energy invalidate any strict linkage. The confusion caused by equating physical energy with moral, religious and other types of energy is a result of mixing definable sciences with indefinable values. The energy-civilization equation dates to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, when new energy sources transformed social and economic life and were credited with enhancing civilization. The pessimistic view can also be taken, but the author questions whether declining energy use will lead to the decline of civilization as quotes from 18th - 20th Century thinkers indicate. 14 references.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Delaware, Newark
OSTI Identifier:
5901808
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5901808
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
EPRI J.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; QUALITY OF LIFE; BEHAVIOR; LIFE STYLES; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; SOCIOLOGY; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS 290200* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Basalla, G. Energy and civilization. United States: N. p., 1979. Web.
Basalla, G. Energy and civilization. United States.
Basalla, G. Sun . "Energy and civilization". United States.
@article{osti_5901808,
title = {Energy and civilization},
author = {Basalla, G.},
abstractNote = {The author challenges the validity of linking energy consumption and civilization levels and suggests that it might be wise to discard the equation. Variations in how individuals choose to use energy invalidate any strict linkage. The confusion caused by equating physical energy with moral, religious and other types of energy is a result of mixing definable sciences with indefinable values. The energy-civilization equation dates to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, when new energy sources transformed social and economic life and were credited with enhancing civilization. The pessimistic view can also be taken, but the author questions whether declining energy use will lead to the decline of civilization as quotes from 18th - 20th Century thinkers indicate. 14 references.},
doi = {},
journal = {EPRI J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 4:6,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {7}
}