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Title: BWR plant analyzer development at BNL

Abstract

Advanced technology for high-speed interactive nuclear power plant simulations is of great value for timely resolution of safety issues, for plant monitoring, and for computer-aided emergency responses to an accident. Presented is the methodology employed at BNL to develop a BWR plant analyzer capable of simulating severe plant transients at much faster than real-time process speeds. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is given for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computers to achieve the very high simulation speeds. Typical results are shown to demonstrate the modeling fidelity of the BWR plant analyzer.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5900118
Report Number(s):
BNL-NUREG-35843; CONF-850411-10
ON: TI85007280; TRN: 85-006394
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76CH00016
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International meeting on advances in nuclear engineering computational methods, Knoxville, TN, USA, 9 Apr 1985
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; BWR TYPE REACTORS; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; REACTOR SAFETY; SYSTEMS ANALYSIS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; BNL; COMPUTER CODES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; ACCIDENTS; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; POWER PLANTS; REACTORS; SAFETY; SIMULATION; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; US AEC; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; WATER MODERATED REACTORS; 220900* - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Reactor Safety; 210100 - Power Reactors, Nonbreeding, Light-Water Moderated, Boiling Water Cooled

Citation Formats

Cheng, H.S., Wulff, W., Mallen, A.N., Lekach, S.V., Stritar, A., and Cerbone, R.J. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Cheng, H.S., Wulff, W., Mallen, A.N., Lekach, S.V., Stritar, A., & Cerbone, R.J. BWR plant analyzer development at BNL. United States.
Cheng, H.S., Wulff, W., Mallen, A.N., Lekach, S.V., Stritar, A., and Cerbone, R.J. Tue . "BWR plant analyzer development at BNL". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5900118.
@article{osti_5900118,
title = {BWR plant analyzer development at BNL},
author = {Cheng, H.S. and Wulff, W. and Mallen, A.N. and Lekach, S.V. and Stritar, A. and Cerbone, R.J.},
abstractNote = {Advanced technology for high-speed interactive nuclear power plant simulations is of great value for timely resolution of safety issues, for plant monitoring, and for computer-aided emergency responses to an accident. Presented is the methodology employed at BNL to develop a BWR plant analyzer capable of simulating severe plant transients at much faster than real-time process speeds. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is given for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computers to achieve the very high simulation speeds. Typical results are shown to demonstrate the modeling fidelity of the BWR plant analyzer.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1985},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1985}
}

Conference:
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  • The objective of this program is to develop an LWR engineering plant analyzer capable of performing realistic and accurate simulations of plant transients and Small-Break Loss of Coolant Accidents at real-time and faster than real-time computing speeds and at low costs for preparing, executing and evaluating such simulations. The program is directed toward facilitating reactor safety analyses, on-line plant monitoring, on-line accident diagnosis and mitigation and toward improving reactor operator training. The AD10 of Applied Dynamics International, Ann Arbor, MI, a special-purpose peripheral processor for high-speed systems simulation, is programmed through a PDP-11/34 minicomputer and carries out digital simulations withmore » analog hardware in the input/output loop (up to 256 channels). Analog signals from a control panel are being used now to activate or to disable valves and to trip pump drive motors or regulators without interrupting the simulation. An IBM personal computer with multicolor graphics capabilities and a CRT monitor are used to produce on-line labelled diagrams of selected plant parameters as functions of time.« less
  • An engineering plant analyzer has been developed at BNL for realistically and accurately simulating transients and severe abnormal events in BWR power plants. Simulations are being carried out routinely with high fidelity, high simulation speed, at low cost and with unsurpassed user convenience. The BNL Plant Analyzer is the only operating facility which (a) simulates more than two orders-of-magnitude faster than the CDC-7600 mainframe computer, (b) is accessible and fully operational in on-line interactive mode, remotely from anywhere in the US, from Europe or the Far East (Korea), via widely available IBM-PC compatible personal computers, standard modems and telephone lines,more » (c) simulates both slow and rapid transients seven times faster than real-time in direct access, and four times faster in remote access modes, (d) achieves high simulation speed without compromising fidelity, and (e) is available to remote access users at the low cost of $160 per hour.« less
  • A class of transients of interest includes those from full power that involve some changes from the plant's technical specifications. These changes are allowed if it can be demonstrated that the effect on key parameters, such as the minimum critical power ratio (MCPR), is acceptable. Another class of transients is of interest for similar reasons, those that are initiated from the maximum extended operating domain (MEOD) or with partial feedwater heating. In the MEOD, the reactor conditions may be different from previous experience to increase the speed of the power ascension or obtain more power out of the core atmore » end-of-cycle when the reactivity of the fuel is low. The critical power ratio (CPR) is used to determine the thermal limits of boiling water reactors (BWRs). In this study, CPRs for a series of transients run on the Brookhaven Plant Analyzer (BPA) have been calculated. The transients include nominal base case simulations; simulations with variations in relief valve setpoints and the number of failed feedwater heaters; simulations at the 100% power, 75% flow point on the extended load line of the MEOD; and a simulation with partial feedwater heating. The plant represented with the BPA is a BWR/4 rated at 3293 MW with a 6.38-m vessel.« less
  • The critical power ratio (CPR) is used for determining the thermal limits of boiling water reactors. In this study, critical power ratios for a series of transients run on the Brookhaven Plant Analyzer (BPA) (1) have been calculated. The transients include nominal base case simulations, simulations with variations in relief valve setpoints and the number of failed feedwater heaters, simulations at the 100% power, 75% flow point on the extended load line of the MEOD, and a simulation with partial feedwater heating. The plant represented with the BPA is a BWR/4 rated at 3293 MW with a 6.38 m (251'')more » vessel. Data were obtained by the Plant Analyzer Development Group at BNL from a variety of sources describing the Browns Ferry Plant.« less
  • This program is being conducted to develop an engineering plant analyzer capable of performing, in a dedicated facility, accurate real-time and faster than real-time simulations of plant transients and small-break loss of coolant accidents in LWR power plants. The analyzer is required to obtain timely and cost-effective answers to a wide variety of safety questions related to the nuclear steam supply system, the balance of the plant and its control systems, for human factors studies (error rate measurements), for risk assessments. For monitoring continuously the operation of a particular power plant, for the detection of instrument, component or system failures,more » and for anticipating the consequences from mitigating operator actions following an accident.« less