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Title: Comparison of performance of flat plate and parabolic trough solar collectors in several US cities

Abstract

One very common use of the flat plate collector is residential water heating. Concentrating thermal collectors have been developed for much higher temperature uses, based on the knowledge that the upper limit on output from the flat plate collector is roughly at the boiling point of water. Total annual outputs are extensively compared. There is a significant variation in relative performance of flat plate and concentrating collectors in different climates. There is a noticeable variation in relative output from winter to summer. In some parts of the United States the weather conditions of winter favor the use of concentrating collectors over flat plate collectors for residential water heating.

Authors:
 [1];
  1. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5900101
Report Number(s):
CONF-810509-(Vol.1)
Journal ID: CODEN: PMSID
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-76DP00789
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proc. Annu. Meet. - Am. Sect. Int. Sol. Energy Soc.; (United States); Journal Volume: 4.1; Conference: Annual conference of the International Solar Energy Society, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 26 May 1981
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; FLAT PLATE COLLECTORS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; PERFORMANCE; PARABOLIC TROUGH COLLECTORS; ENERGY YIELD; MASSACHUSETTS; MONTANA; MONTHLY VARIATIONS; NEW MEXICO; SOLAR WATER HEATING; TENNESSEE; WEATHER; CONCENTRATING COLLECTORS; EQUIPMENT; HEATING; NORTH AMERICA; NORTH ATLANTIC REGION; PARABOLIC COLLECTORS; ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION; SOLAR COLLECTORS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; SOLAR HEATING; SOUTHEAST REGION; SOUTHWEST REGION; USA; VARIATIONS; WATER HEATING; YIELDS; 141000* - Solar Collectors & Concentrators

Citation Formats

Stromberg, R.P., and Bush, L.D. Comparison of performance of flat plate and parabolic trough solar collectors in several US cities. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Stromberg, R.P., & Bush, L.D. Comparison of performance of flat plate and parabolic trough solar collectors in several US cities. United States.
Stromberg, R.P., and Bush, L.D. Thu . "Comparison of performance of flat plate and parabolic trough solar collectors in several US cities". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5900101,
title = {Comparison of performance of flat plate and parabolic trough solar collectors in several US cities},
author = {Stromberg, R.P. and Bush, L.D.},
abstractNote = {One very common use of the flat plate collector is residential water heating. Concentrating thermal collectors have been developed for much higher temperature uses, based on the knowledge that the upper limit on output from the flat plate collector is roughly at the boiling point of water. Total annual outputs are extensively compared. There is a significant variation in relative performance of flat plate and concentrating collectors in different climates. There is a noticeable variation in relative output from winter to summer. In some parts of the United States the weather conditions of winter favor the use of concentrating collectors over flat plate collectors for residential water heating.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proc. Annu. Meet. - Am. Sect. Int. Sol. Energy Soc.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 4.1,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1981},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1981}
}

Conference:
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  • Surveys of industrial process energy requirements that may be met by the use of solar systems show that about one-third of all energy applications occur between 150/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, and less than 3% occur below 150/sup 0/F. Performance comparisons have been made between flat-plate collectors of high quality and parabolic-trough collectors of current quality to identify the solar technology with the greatest potential for near-term impact over the temperature range that spans many process heat applications. The results indicate equal performance at temperatures as low as 110/sup 0/F. Since troughs are already functioning at 600/sup 0/F, the tentativemore » conclusion is that parabolic troughs may reasonably be used for applications within the identified temperature range.« less
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