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Title: Concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the early placentas of arsenate-dosed hamsters

Abstract

The authors determined the concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the placentas of hamsters following continuous exposure via the osmotic minipump to minimally and frankly teratogenic doses of arsenate. Close to 70% of the placental arsenic is bound to macromolecules, two-thirds of which is dialyzable. The remaining 30% of arsenic consists of low molecular weight species, predominantly inorganic arsenic. This mix is the same for minimally teratogenic and frankly teratogenic doses of arsenate.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH
OSTI Identifier:
5897429
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environ. Res.; (United States); Journal Volume: 42:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ARSENIC; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; CHEMICAL STATE; MEMBRANE TRANSPORT; FETAL MEMBRANES; HAMSTERS; TERATOGENESIS; ANIMALS; ELEMENTS; MAMMALS; MEMBRANES; RODENTS; SEMIMETALS; VERTEBRATES; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Hanlon, D.P., and Ferm, V.H. Concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the early placentas of arsenate-dosed hamsters. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1016/S0013-9351(87)80221-9.
Hanlon, D.P., & Ferm, V.H. Concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the early placentas of arsenate-dosed hamsters. United States. doi:10.1016/S0013-9351(87)80221-9.
Hanlon, D.P., and Ferm, V.H. Wed . "Concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the early placentas of arsenate-dosed hamsters". United States. doi:10.1016/S0013-9351(87)80221-9.
@article{osti_5897429,
title = {Concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the early placentas of arsenate-dosed hamsters},
author = {Hanlon, D.P. and Ferm, V.H.},
abstractNote = {The authors determined the concentration and chemical status of arsenic in the placentas of hamsters following continuous exposure via the osmotic minipump to minimally and frankly teratogenic doses of arsenate. Close to 70% of the placental arsenic is bound to macromolecules, two-thirds of which is dialyzable. The remaining 30% of arsenic consists of low molecular weight species, predominantly inorganic arsenic. This mix is the same for minimally teratogenic and frankly teratogenic doses of arsenate.},
doi = {10.1016/S0013-9351(87)80221-9},
journal = {Environ. Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 42:2,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1987},
month = {Wed Apr 01 00:00:00 EST 1987}
}
  • The concentration, availability, and chemical status of radiolabeled arsenic has been determined in the blood of pregnant hamsters at the beginning (morning of Day 8) and the end (morning of Day 9) of the critical period of embryogenesis. Hamster dams were exposed to teratogenic doses of arsenate by means of osmotic minipumps implanted on the morning of Day 6 of the gestation period. Whole blood arsenic concentrations were the same for 48 and 72 hr postimplant. The arsenic concentration of plasma equaled that of red cells. Plasma arsenic was not bound to macromolecules and had the same chemical status 48more » and 72 hr postimplant. Arsenate was the dominant form (67% of the total). However, the presence of dimethylarsinic acid and arsenite indicates that the pentavalent species was metabolized. Red cell arsenic was bound to macromolecules in the cell sap. Seventy percent of red cell sap arsenic was dialyzable 48 hr postimplant, but only 56% 72 hr postimplant. Arsenate was the dominant dialyzable red cell species on Day 8 and arsenite was the major dialyzable form on Day 9. The authors findings demonstrate a relationship between the maternal blood concentration and chemical status of arsenic and the presence of malformations resulting from a constant rate exposure of pregnant hamsters to arsenate via the osmotic minipump.« less
  • The concentration and chemical composition of arsenic has been determined in the blood of pregnant hamsters between 0.2 and 6 hr after an intraperitoneal injection of a teratogenic dose of radiolabeled sodium arsenate on the morning of the eighth day of gestation. Arsenic was present in plasma and red cells 0.20 hr postinjection. The plasma arsenic concentration reached a maximum of 220 ..mu..mole/kg blood near 0.5 hr postinjection. Plasma arsenic existed entirely as low-molecular-weight species. Both arsenite and dimethylarsinate (DMA) were present in plasma 0.20 hr postinjection, indicating that arsenate reduction and methylation of arsenic are rapidly initiated. However, themore » arsenite contribution remained small while the DMA contribution increased with time. Red cells arsenic included macromolecular arsenic (AsP) as well as three low-molecular-weight forms. The contribution of DMA remained small, but arsenite and AsP contributions increased with time. These findings identify the maternal blood concentration and chemical status of arsenic following the administration of a teratogenic dose of arsenate during the period of organogenesis. They could prove useful for predicting the likelihood of a teratogenic outcome in other mammalian species.« less
  • The teratogenic and embryotoxic effects of constant-rate exposure of pregnant hamsters to arsenate have been examined by means of subcutaneous implants of osmotic minipumps. Different total exposure regimes were established by varying the duration of minipump implants and by varying the concentration of arsenate in the minipumps. Dams were killed on Day 13 pregnancy, 5 days after the critical stage of organogenesis. Numbers of resorptions, dead fetuses, and living fetuses were obtained. Fetal weights, crown-rump lengths, and the incidence of malformations were recorded. Control animals were treated identically with minipumps containing demineralized water. The percentage of malformations per litter, amore » direct measure of teratogenesis, was dependent only upon the concentration of arsenate in the minipumps. The minimum teratogenic response was achieved with a dose of 70 ..mu..mol/kg dam/24 hr during the critical stages of organogenesis. The embryotoxic (fetotoxic) indicators, fetal weight and crown-rump length, decreased with increases in exposure time and with increased concentrations of arsenate. The resorption rate also depended directly upon duration of exposure and concentration of arsenate in the mini-pump.« less
  • This research compares the As and Cr chemistry ofdislodgeable residues from Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA)-treated woodcollected by two different techniques (directly from the board surfaceeither by rubbing with a soft bristle brush or from human hands aftercontact with CCA-treated wood), and demonstrates that these materials areequivalent in terms of the chemical form and bonding of As and Cr and interms of the As leaching behavior. This finding links the extensivechemical characterization and bioavailability testing that has been donepreviously on the brush-removed residue to a material that is derivedfrom human skin contact with CCA-treated wood. Additionally, thisresearch characterizes the arsenic presentmore » in biological fluids (sweatand simulated gastric fluid) following contact with these residues. Thedata demonstrate that in biological fluids, the arsenic is presentprimarily as free arsenate ions.Arsenic-containing soils were alsoextracted into human sweat to evaluate the potential for arsenicdissolution from soils at the skin surface. For soils from field sites,only a small fraction of the total arsenic is soluble in sweat. Based oncomparisons to reference materials that have been used in in vivo dermalabsorption studies, these findings suggest that the actual relativebioavailability via dermal absorption of As from CCA-residues and soilmay be well below the current default value of 3 percent used by U.S.EPA.« less
  • We determined the gastrointestinal absorption of the arsenic in Ironite, a readily available fertilizer, for male hamsters (Golden Syrian), considered to be an excellent model for how the human processes inorganic arsenic. Urine and feces were collected after administering an aqueous suspension of Ironite by stomach tube. In addition, we studied the forms and oxidation states of arsenic in Ironite by synchrotron spectroscopic techniques. The absorption of the arsenic in Ironite (1-0-0) was 21.2% and the absorption relative to sodium arsenite was 31.0%. Our results using XANES spectra determinations indicate that Ironite contains scorodite (AsV) as well as previously reportedmore » arsenopyrite (As(-1)). Since the 1-0-0 Ironite is readily available for purchase, its risk assessment for children by professionals is recommended. This is especially important because it is used to fertilize large areas of grass in playgrounds and parks where children play. The absorption of the arsenic in it, the hand to mouth activity of children, and the potential of ground water contamination makes the use of 1-0-0 Ironite as a fertilizer a potential environmental hazard.« less