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Title: Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. I. Theory

Abstract

Because of the equivalence principle, a global measurement is necessary to distinguish gravity from acceleration of the reference frame. A gravity gradiometer is therefore an essential instrument needed for precision tests of gravity laws and for applications in gravity survey and inertial navigation. Superconductivity and SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) technology can be used to obtain a gravity gradiometer with very high sensitivity and stability. A superconducting gravity gradiometer has been developed for a null test of the gravitational inverse-square law and space-borne geodesy. Here we present a complete theoretical model of this instrument. Starting from dynamical equations for the device, we derive transfer functions, a common mode rejection characteristic, and an error model of the superconducting instrument. Since a gradiometer must detect a very weak differential gravity signal in the midst of large platform accelerations and other environmental disturbances, the scale factor and common mode rejection stability of the instrument are extremely important in addition to its immunity to temperature and electromagnetic fluctuations. We show how flux quantization, the Meissner effect, and properties of liquid helium can be utilized to meet these challenges.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742
OSTI Identifier:
5896219
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Phys. Rev. D; (United States); Journal Volume: 35:12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTORS; SQUID DEVICES; EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLE; GEODESY; GRAVIMETRY; MAGNETIC FLUX; QUANTIZATION; SENSITIVITY; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; FLUXMETERS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT; RADIATION DETECTORS; SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES; 640106* - Astrophysics & Cosmology- Cosmology

Citation Formats

Chan, H.A., and Paik, H.J. Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. I. Theory. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.35.3551.
Chan, H.A., & Paik, H.J. Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. I. Theory. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.35.3551.
Chan, H.A., and Paik, H.J. Mon . "Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. I. Theory". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.35.3551.
@article{osti_5896219,
title = {Superconducting gravity gradiometer for sensitive gravity measurements. I. Theory},
author = {Chan, H.A. and Paik, H.J.},
abstractNote = {Because of the equivalence principle, a global measurement is necessary to distinguish gravity from acceleration of the reference frame. A gravity gradiometer is therefore an essential instrument needed for precision tests of gravity laws and for applications in gravity survey and inertial navigation. Superconductivity and SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) technology can be used to obtain a gravity gradiometer with very high sensitivity and stability. A superconducting gravity gradiometer has been developed for a null test of the gravitational inverse-square law and space-borne geodesy. Here we present a complete theoretical model of this instrument. Starting from dynamical equations for the device, we derive transfer functions, a common mode rejection characteristic, and an error model of the superconducting instrument. Since a gradiometer must detect a very weak differential gravity signal in the midst of large platform accelerations and other environmental disturbances, the scale factor and common mode rejection stability of the instrument are extremely important in addition to its immunity to temperature and electromagnetic fluctuations. We show how flux quantization, the Meissner effect, and properties of liquid helium can be utilized to meet these challenges.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.35.3551},
journal = {Phys. Rev. D; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 35:12,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 1987},
month = {Mon Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 1987}
}