skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Tumorigenic DNA viruses

Abstract

The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5893933
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5893933
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ONCOGENIC VIRUSES; AIDS; DNA; GENOME MUTATIONS; IMMUNOLOGY; LEADING ABSTRACT; NEOPLASMS; PATHOLOGY; REVIEWS; RNA; TRANSCRIPTION; ABSTRACTS; DISEASES; DOCUMENT TYPES; HEMIC DISEASES; IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES; INFECTIOUS DISEASES; MICROORGANISMS; MUTATIONS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PARASITES; VIRAL DISEASES; VIRUSES 550900* -- Pathology

Citation Formats

Klein, G. Tumorigenic DNA viruses. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Klein, G. Tumorigenic DNA viruses. United States.
Klein, G. Sun . "Tumorigenic DNA viruses". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5893933,
title = {Tumorigenic DNA viruses},
author = {Klein, G.},
abstractNote = {The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}

Book:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this book.

Save / Share:
  • This book serves as an excellent text in comparative virology, with an up-to-data overview and detail for each group of DNA tumor viruses. The authors review the common and diverse mechanisms of action of the transforming proteins of DNA tumor viruses. The work presents detailed, original studies with a set of gene products known to be involved in contributing to cancer in animals and even humans. This collection of diverse viruses in a single volume offers a new opportunity to examine transformation and tumorigenesis.
  • This book contains eight sections, each consisting of several papers. The sections are: Introduction, Transcription; Regulation of Transcription; RNA Processing and Translation; Transformation; Transforming Proteins; Replication; and Papillomaviruses.
  • This book examines the molecular biology, disease pathogenesis, epidemiology, and clinical features of hepadna and other viruses with hepatic tropism and outlines future directions and approaches for their management. The volume's six sections provide a review of the various features, mechanisms, and functions of these viruses, ranging from hepadna virus replication and regulation of gene expression to the structure and function of hepadna-virus gene products.
  • This thesis investigates a recently discovered vulnerability in computer systems which opens the possibility that a single individual with an average user's knowledge could cause widespread damage to information residing in computer networks. This vulnerability is due to a transitive integrity corrupting mechanism called a computer virus which causes corrupted information to spread from program to program. Experiments have shown that a virus can spread at an alarmingly rapid rate from user to user, from system to system, and from network to network, even when the best-availability security techniques are properly used. Formal definitions of self-replication, evolution, viruses, and protectionmore » mechanisms are used to prove that any system that allows sharing, general functionality, and transitivity of information flow cannot completely prevent viral attack. Computational aspects of viruses are examined, and several undecidable problems are shown. It is demonstrated that a virus may evolve so as to generate any computable sequence. Protection mechanisms are explored, and the design of computer networks that prevent both illicit modification and dissemination of information are given. Administration and protection of information networks based on partial orderings are examined, and probably correct automated administrative assistance is introduced.« less
  • This book contains 12 selections. Some of the titles are: Genome Structure;Genetics of Retroviruses;Functions and Origins of Retroviral Transforming Genes;Human T-cell Retroviruses;Replications of Retroviruses;and Endogenous Viruses.