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Title: Inorganics. [Procedures for chemical analysis of inorganics in water and waste water]

Abstract

This review follows the format of previous reviews in relying on tables to present the major accomplishments of 1989. Quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC), and sampling procedures are shown in table 1. Increasing use of advanced statistical methods and computer software was characteristic of this field. Table 2 reviews sample preparation and preconcentration procedures that showed development in the application of on-line preconcentration systems and membrane filtration. The use of ion-exchange resins was wide-spread in the speciation of the elements (Table 3). Among the chromatographic techniques (Table 4), ion chromatography (IC) allowed improvements to be made in the analysis of alkaline, alkaline earth, and transition metals, gas chromatography (GC), and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) combined with derivatization. Atomic spectroscopy (Table 5), atomic absorption (AAS), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), and ICP mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed great versatility in inventing various hyphenated methods like hydride generation-graphite furnace AAS (HG-GF-AAS) or on-line HG-ICP. Detection limits (DL) were further improved. Electrochemical methods are reviewed in Table 6. New types of ion selective electrodes (ISE) were introduced. One of the most dynamically developing fields was flow-injection (FIA) and continuous flow analysis (CFA) (Table 7). X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and neutronmore » activation analysis (NAA) techniques are included in Table 8; spectrophotometric methods are represented in Table 9. For Tables 2 through 9, the listing only includes those references where the methodology was used for more than one element or compounds are cited by element or compound.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5891921
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Research Journal of the Water Pollution Control Federation; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 62:4; Journal ID: ISSN 1047-7624
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; INORGANIC COMPOUNDS; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; WASTE WATER; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ACTIVATION ANALYSIS; ELECTROCHEMISTRY; EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY; ION EXCHANGE; ION EXCHANGE CHROMATOGRAPHY; ION SELECTIVE ELECTRODE ANALYSIS; LIQUID COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; QUALITY ASSURANCE; QUALITY CONTROL; SAMPLING; SPECTROPHOTOMETRY; X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS; CHEMISTRY; CHROMATOGRAPHY; CONTROL; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; LIQUID WASTES; NONDESTRUCTIVE ANALYSIS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; SPECTROSCOPY; WASTES; WATER; X-RAY EMISSION ANALYSIS; 400102* - Chemical & Spectral Procedures; 540320 - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)

Citation Formats

De Cheke, M E. Inorganics. [Procedures for chemical analysis of inorganics in water and waste water]. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
De Cheke, M E. Inorganics. [Procedures for chemical analysis of inorganics in water and waste water]. United States.
De Cheke, M E. Fri . "Inorganics. [Procedures for chemical analysis of inorganics in water and waste water]". United States.
@article{osti_5891921,
title = {Inorganics. [Procedures for chemical analysis of inorganics in water and waste water]},
author = {De Cheke, M E},
abstractNote = {This review follows the format of previous reviews in relying on tables to present the major accomplishments of 1989. Quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC), and sampling procedures are shown in table 1. Increasing use of advanced statistical methods and computer software was characteristic of this field. Table 2 reviews sample preparation and preconcentration procedures that showed development in the application of on-line preconcentration systems and membrane filtration. The use of ion-exchange resins was wide-spread in the speciation of the elements (Table 3). Among the chromatographic techniques (Table 4), ion chromatography (IC) allowed improvements to be made in the analysis of alkaline, alkaline earth, and transition metals, gas chromatography (GC), and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) combined with derivatization. Atomic spectroscopy (Table 5), atomic absorption (AAS), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), and ICP mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed great versatility in inventing various hyphenated methods like hydride generation-graphite furnace AAS (HG-GF-AAS) or on-line HG-ICP. Detection limits (DL) were further improved. Electrochemical methods are reviewed in Table 6. New types of ion selective electrodes (ISE) were introduced. One of the most dynamically developing fields was flow-injection (FIA) and continuous flow analysis (CFA) (Table 7). X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques are included in Table 8; spectrophotometric methods are represented in Table 9. For Tables 2 through 9, the listing only includes those references where the methodology was used for more than one element or compounds are cited by element or compound.},
doi = {},
journal = {Research Journal of the Water Pollution Control Federation; (United States)},
issn = {1047-7624},
number = ,
volume = 62:4,
place = {United States},
year = {1990},
month = {6}
}