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Title: Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors

Abstract

Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) either stimulates or inhibits laryngeal receptors in the cat. The aim of this study was to correlate the CO{sub 2} response of laryngeal receptors with their response to other known stimuli (i.e. pressure, movement, cold, water and smoke). Single unit action potentials were recorded from fibers in the superior laryngeal nerve of 5 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs together with CO{sub 2} concentration, esophageal and subglottic pressure. Constant streams of warm, humidified air or 10% CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2} were passed through the functionally isolated upper airway for 60 s. Eight of 13 randomly firing or silent receptors were stimulated by CO{sub 2} (from 0.4{plus minus}0.1 to 1.8{plus minus}0.4 imp.s). These non-respiratory-modulated receptors were more strongly stimulated by solutions lacking Cl{sup {minus}} and/or cigarette smoke. Six of 21 respiratory modulated receptors (responding to pressure and/or laryngeal motion) were either inhibited or stimulated by CO{sub 2}. Our results show that no laryngeal receptor responds only to CO{sub 2}. Silent or randomly active receptors were stimulated most often by CO{sub 2} consistent with the reflex effect of CO{sub 2} in the larynx.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. (Univ. of Texas, Galveston (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5891552
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5891552
Report Number(s):
CONF-9104107--
Journal ID: ISSN 0892-6638; CODEN: FAJOE
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: FASEB Journal (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology); (United States); Journal Volume: 4:3; Conference: 75. annual meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), Atlanta, GA (United States), 21-25 Apr 1991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CARBON DIOXIDE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; DOGS; LARYNX; RECEPTORS; STIMULATION; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TOBACCO SMOKES; AEROSOLS; ANIMALS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; COLLOIDS; DISPERSIONS; HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; MAMMALS; MEMBRANE PROTEINS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PROTEINS; RESIDUES; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; SMOKES; SOLS; VERTEBRATES 560300* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Anderson, J.W., Sant'Ambrogio, F.B., Orani, G.P., Sant'Ambrogio, G., and Mathew, O.P.. Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Anderson, J.W., Sant'Ambrogio, F.B., Orani, G.P., Sant'Ambrogio, G., & Mathew, O.P.. Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors. United States.
Anderson, J.W., Sant'Ambrogio, F.B., Orani, G.P., Sant'Ambrogio, G., and Mathew, O.P.. Mon . "Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5891552,
title = {Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors},
author = {Anderson, J.W. and Sant'Ambrogio, F.B. and Orani, G.P. and Sant'Ambrogio, G. and Mathew, O.P.},
abstractNote = {Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) either stimulates or inhibits laryngeal receptors in the cat. The aim of this study was to correlate the CO{sub 2} response of laryngeal receptors with their response to other known stimuli (i.e. pressure, movement, cold, water and smoke). Single unit action potentials were recorded from fibers in the superior laryngeal nerve of 5 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs together with CO{sub 2} concentration, esophageal and subglottic pressure. Constant streams of warm, humidified air or 10% CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2} were passed through the functionally isolated upper airway for 60 s. Eight of 13 randomly firing or silent receptors were stimulated by CO{sub 2} (from 0.4{plus minus}0.1 to 1.8{plus minus}0.4 imp.s). These non-respiratory-modulated receptors were more strongly stimulated by solutions lacking Cl{sup {minus}} and/or cigarette smoke. Six of 21 respiratory modulated receptors (responding to pressure and/or laryngeal motion) were either inhibited or stimulated by CO{sub 2}. Our results show that no laryngeal receptor responds only to CO{sub 2}. Silent or randomly active receptors were stimulated most often by CO{sub 2} consistent with the reflex effect of CO{sub 2} in the larynx.},
doi = {},
journal = {FASEB Journal (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 4:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 26 00:00:00 EST 1990},
month = {Mon Feb 26 00:00:00 EST 1990}
}

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