skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Soviet oceanographic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research

Abstract

Radar non-acoustic anti-submarine warfare (NAASW) became the subject of considerable scientific investigation and controversy in the West subsequent to the discovery by the Seasat satellite in 1978 that manifestations of underwater topography, thought to be hidden from the radar, were visible in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the ocean. In addition, the Seasat radar produced images of ship wakes where the observed angle between the wake arms was much smaller than expected from classical Kelvin wake theory. These observations cast doubt on the radar oceanography community's ability to adequately explain these phenomena, and by extension on the ability of existing hydrodynamic and radar scattering models to accurately predict the observability of submarine-induced signatures. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW is indeed a potentially significant tool in detecting submerged operational submarines, then the Soviet capability, as evidenced throughout this report, will be somewhat daunting. It will be shown that the Soviets have extremely fine capabilities in both theoretical and experimental hydrodynamics, that Soviet researchers have been conducting at-sea radar remote sensing experiments on a scale comparable to those of the United States for several years longer than we have, and that they have both an airborne andmore » spaceborne SAR capability. The only discipline that the Soviet Union appears to be lacking is in the area of digital radar signal processing. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW can have at most a minimal impact on the detection of submerged submarines, then the Soviet effort is of little consequence and poses not threat. 280 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA). Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center
OSTI Identifier:
5870284
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5870284; Legacy ID: TI91010930
Report Number(s):
FASAC-TAR-91010930
ON: TI91010930
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 58 GEOSCIENCES; OCEANOGRAPHY; SYNTHETIC-APERTURE RADAR; SUBMARINES; DETECTION; USSR; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; DATA ANALYSIS; DATA PROCESSING; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; HYDRODYNAMICS; IMAGES; INTERNAL WAVES; REMOTE SENSING; SATELLITES; SURFACE WATERS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; WATER CURRENTS; WAVE PROPAGATION; ASIA; CURRENTS; EASTERN EUROPE; EUROPE; FLUID MECHANICS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MECHANICS; PROCESSING; RADAR; RANGE FINDERS; SHIPS 450000* -- Military Technology, Weaponry, & National Defense; 580000 -- Geosciences

Citation Formats

Held, D.N., Gasparovic, R.F., Mansfield, A.W., Melville, W.K., Mollo-Christensen, E.L., and Zebker, H.A. Soviet oceanographic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Held, D.N., Gasparovic, R.F., Mansfield, A.W., Melville, W.K., Mollo-Christensen, E.L., & Zebker, H.A. Soviet oceanographic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research. United States.
Held, D.N., Gasparovic, R.F., Mansfield, A.W., Melville, W.K., Mollo-Christensen, E.L., and Zebker, H.A. Tue . "Soviet oceanographic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5870284,
title = {Soviet oceanographic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research},
author = {Held, D.N. and Gasparovic, R.F. and Mansfield, A.W. and Melville, W.K. and Mollo-Christensen, E.L. and Zebker, H.A.},
abstractNote = {Radar non-acoustic anti-submarine warfare (NAASW) became the subject of considerable scientific investigation and controversy in the West subsequent to the discovery by the Seasat satellite in 1978 that manifestations of underwater topography, thought to be hidden from the radar, were visible in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the ocean. In addition, the Seasat radar produced images of ship wakes where the observed angle between the wake arms was much smaller than expected from classical Kelvin wake theory. These observations cast doubt on the radar oceanography community's ability to adequately explain these phenomena, and by extension on the ability of existing hydrodynamic and radar scattering models to accurately predict the observability of submarine-induced signatures. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW is indeed a potentially significant tool in detecting submerged operational submarines, then the Soviet capability, as evidenced throughout this report, will be somewhat daunting. It will be shown that the Soviets have extremely fine capabilities in both theoretical and experimental hydrodynamics, that Soviet researchers have been conducting at-sea radar remote sensing experiments on a scale comparable to those of the United States for several years longer than we have, and that they have both an airborne and spaceborne SAR capability. The only discipline that the Soviet Union appears to be lacking is in the area of digital radar signal processing. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW can have at most a minimal impact on the detection of submerged submarines, then the Soviet effort is of little consequence and poses not threat. 280 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1991},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1991}
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share: