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Title: The use of phosphorus in sequestration of lead and cadmium in a smelter slag

Abstract

The site of an abandoned lead smelter near the village of Dearing in southeastern Kansas is a continuing environmental and health concern because of high levels of heavy metal contamination, including lead and cadmium. Phosphate amendment of lead-contaminated soils is known to precipitate highly insoluble lead pyromorphite (Pb{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl), effectively reducing its bioavailability. In this study, samples of Dearing slag were incubated with two different forms of soluble phosphate (apatite and potassium phosphate). Lead content of the amended slag decreased in the exchangeable, carbonate, iron- and manganese-oxide, and organic fractions of the slag, while increasing in the residual fraction. At the same time, cadmium content of the amended slag decreased in the exchangeable and iron and manganese fractions, while increasing in the carbonate and residual fractions. X-ray diffractometry shows that lead pyromorphite abundance increased in the phosphate-amended slag, suggesting that lead was precipitated as pyromorphite. Cadmium may have been precipitated as relatively insoluble octavite (CdCO{sub 3}). Of the two phosphate amendments, potassium phosphate was more effective in reducing soluble lead and cadmium, and increasing pyromorphite abundance. Also, rate effect was more important than the effect of time in remediating the slag.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
585784
Report Number(s):
CONF-9705104-
Journal ID: ISSN 1054-8564; TRN: IM9810%%30
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 12. Annual conference on hazardous waste remediation, Kansas City, MO (United States), 20-22 May 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 12. annual conference on hazardous waste research. Building partnerships for innovative technologies; Erickson, L.E.; Rankin, M.M.; Grant, S.C.; McDonald, J.P. [eds.]; PB: 586 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; LEAD; CADMIUM; REMEDIAL ACTION; KANSAS; SMELTERS; ABANDONED SITES; SOILS; SLAGS; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY

Citation Formats

Lambert, M, Pierzynski, G, and Hettiarachchi, G. The use of phosphorus in sequestration of lead and cadmium in a smelter slag. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Lambert, M, Pierzynski, G, & Hettiarachchi, G. The use of phosphorus in sequestration of lead and cadmium in a smelter slag. United States.
Lambert, M, Pierzynski, G, and Hettiarachchi, G. Wed . "The use of phosphorus in sequestration of lead and cadmium in a smelter slag". United States.
@article{osti_585784,
title = {The use of phosphorus in sequestration of lead and cadmium in a smelter slag},
author = {Lambert, M and Pierzynski, G and Hettiarachchi, G},
abstractNote = {The site of an abandoned lead smelter near the village of Dearing in southeastern Kansas is a continuing environmental and health concern because of high levels of heavy metal contamination, including lead and cadmium. Phosphate amendment of lead-contaminated soils is known to precipitate highly insoluble lead pyromorphite (Pb{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl), effectively reducing its bioavailability. In this study, samples of Dearing slag were incubated with two different forms of soluble phosphate (apatite and potassium phosphate). Lead content of the amended slag decreased in the exchangeable, carbonate, iron- and manganese-oxide, and organic fractions of the slag, while increasing in the residual fraction. At the same time, cadmium content of the amended slag decreased in the exchangeable and iron and manganese fractions, while increasing in the carbonate and residual fractions. X-ray diffractometry shows that lead pyromorphite abundance increased in the phosphate-amended slag, suggesting that lead was precipitated as pyromorphite. Cadmium may have been precipitated as relatively insoluble octavite (CdCO{sub 3}). Of the two phosphate amendments, potassium phosphate was more effective in reducing soluble lead and cadmium, and increasing pyromorphite abundance. Also, rate effect was more important than the effect of time in remediating the slag.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
issn = {1054-8564},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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