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Title: Brightening triticale's future

Abstract

Triticales, hybrids of wheat and rye, were first developed a century ago to take advantage of the natural disease resistances found in each parent. Yields of up to 30 percent more than wheat have been obtained on marginal lands. The hybrids have been grown mainly for animal feed with some used to make flour for human consumption. Growth under adverse conditions has been found in soils that are sandy, cold, infertile, dry, and mineral deficient as well as in soils of high acidity and alkalinity and of high boron and aluminum content. The NRC predicts that triticales will be grown increasingly on marginal land due to climate changes caused by the greenhouse effect.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (USA)
  2. Salinity Research Laboratory, Riverside, CA (USA)
  3. USDA-ARS Wheat and Other Crops Research, Stillwater, (OK)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5852633
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Agricultural Research (Beltsville, MD); (USA)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 38:2; Journal ID: ISSN 0002-161X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AGRICULTURE; DISEASE RESISTANCE; PLANTS; HYBRIDIZATION; ANIMAL FEEDS; APHIDS; BREAD; CROPS; DROUGHTS; FLOUR; FOOD; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; INSECTICIDES; NUTRITION; RYE; SALINITY; SOILS; WHEAT; ANIMALS; ARTHROPODS; CEREALS; GRASS; HEMIPTERA; INDUSTRY; INSECTS; INVERTEBRATES; LILIOPSIDA; MAGNOLIOPHYTA; PESTICIDES; 553000* - Agriculture & Food Technology

Citation Formats

Gustafson, J P, Francois, L E, and Webster, J A. Brightening triticale's future. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Gustafson, J P, Francois, L E, & Webster, J A. Brightening triticale's future. United States.
Gustafson, J P, Francois, L E, and Webster, J A. Thu . "Brightening triticale's future". United States.
@article{osti_5852633,
title = {Brightening triticale's future},
author = {Gustafson, J P and Francois, L E and Webster, J A},
abstractNote = {Triticales, hybrids of wheat and rye, were first developed a century ago to take advantage of the natural disease resistances found in each parent. Yields of up to 30 percent more than wheat have been obtained on marginal lands. The hybrids have been grown mainly for animal feed with some used to make flour for human consumption. Growth under adverse conditions has been found in soils that are sandy, cold, infertile, dry, and mineral deficient as well as in soils of high acidity and alkalinity and of high boron and aluminum content. The NRC predicts that triticales will be grown increasingly on marginal land due to climate changes caused by the greenhouse effect.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5852633}, journal = {Agricultural Research (Beltsville, MD); (USA)},
issn = {0002-161X},
number = ,
volume = 38:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1990},
month = {2}
}