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Title: Generating electricity with wood chips: a promising market for loggers. [Vermont]

Abstract

The Burlington Electric Department in Vermont is on the verge of constructing a 50-megawatt plant fueled with green wood chips. B.E.D. and state foresters have agreed to a code of silvicultural ethics that will dictate absolutely every phase of whole tree chipping involved with procuring the vast amount of fuel. ''The Harvesting Policy for Whole Tree Chipping Operations in Vermont'' mandates that all refuse be removed from the logging site; that hiking trails remain unaffected; that visual impact be minimal; that wild-life, fisheries, and deeryards be considered, with the consultation of a state biologist when necessary; that archeological sites be protected; that remaining trees be safeguarded, and that erosion and fire prevention controls be enacted. Studies completed within the past three years show that there are 29 million green tons of rough and rotten trees within a 50-mile radius of the Burlington plant. A U.S. Forest Service survey has determined that there are 3.6 million green tons of annual unutilized growth within that 50-mile radius. There is enough rough and rotten wood to avoid competition between B.E.D. chippers and small loggers or home owners harvesting firewood. Because the State Public Service Board has mandated that 75% of the chips travelmore » by rail to the plant, the shipping radius will be increased from the 80 trucking miles B.E.D. now pays for. Some of the chips will come from thinning stands on a selective basis and others from clear-cutting for farmland, new developments, or ski trails. Already B.E.D. has 2500 acres in the Tree Farm Family. B.E.D. has published an attractive brochure, aimed at convincing landowners to sign up for the program. Over much of New York and New England there are no markets for chips. Following a recent land-clearing operation in New Hampshire, a logger hauled his chips to B.E.D. B.E.D.'s payment barely covered the trucking costs.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Northern Logger and Timber Processor Magazine, Old Forge, NY
OSTI Identifier:
5845835
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
North. Logger; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 30:11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; REFUSE-FUELED POWER PLANTS; PLANNING; VERMONT; WOOD WASTES; MARKET; COMBUSTION; COST; ELECTRIC POWER; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; FOREST LITTER; RESOURCE ASSESSMENT; TRANSPORT; WOOD FUELS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ENERGY SOURCES; FEDERAL REGION I; FUELS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; MATERIALS; NORTH AMERICA; OXIDATION; POWER; POWER PLANTS; SOLID WASTES; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; USA; WASTES; 090400* - Solid Waste & Wood Fuels- (-1989); 200108 - Fossil-Fueled Power Plants- Fuels- (1980-); 140504 - Solar Energy Conversion- Biomass Production & Conversion- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Crowe, N. Generating electricity with wood chips: a promising market for loggers. [Vermont]. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Crowe, N. Generating electricity with wood chips: a promising market for loggers. [Vermont]. United States.
Crowe, N. Fri . "Generating electricity with wood chips: a promising market for loggers. [Vermont]". United States.
@article{osti_5845835,
title = {Generating electricity with wood chips: a promising market for loggers. [Vermont]},
author = {Crowe, N},
abstractNote = {The Burlington Electric Department in Vermont is on the verge of constructing a 50-megawatt plant fueled with green wood chips. B.E.D. and state foresters have agreed to a code of silvicultural ethics that will dictate absolutely every phase of whole tree chipping involved with procuring the vast amount of fuel. ''The Harvesting Policy for Whole Tree Chipping Operations in Vermont'' mandates that all refuse be removed from the logging site; that hiking trails remain unaffected; that visual impact be minimal; that wild-life, fisheries, and deeryards be considered, with the consultation of a state biologist when necessary; that archeological sites be protected; that remaining trees be safeguarded, and that erosion and fire prevention controls be enacted. Studies completed within the past three years show that there are 29 million green tons of rough and rotten trees within a 50-mile radius of the Burlington plant. A U.S. Forest Service survey has determined that there are 3.6 million green tons of annual unutilized growth within that 50-mile radius. There is enough rough and rotten wood to avoid competition between B.E.D. chippers and small loggers or home owners harvesting firewood. Because the State Public Service Board has mandated that 75% of the chips travel by rail to the plant, the shipping radius will be increased from the 80 trucking miles B.E.D. now pays for. Some of the chips will come from thinning stands on a selective basis and others from clear-cutting for farmland, new developments, or ski trails. Already B.E.D. has 2500 acres in the Tree Farm Family. B.E.D. has published an attractive brochure, aimed at convincing landowners to sign up for the program. Over much of New York and New England there are no markets for chips. Following a recent land-clearing operation in New Hampshire, a logger hauled his chips to B.E.D. B.E.D.'s payment barely covered the trucking costs.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5845835}, journal = {North. Logger; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 30:11,
place = {United States},
year = {1982},
month = {1}
}