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Title: Carbon adsorption onsite for remedial actions

Abstract

Environmental remediation options range from various offsite disposal methods to onsite concentration, treatment or storage. Onsite treatment using mobile carbon adsorption treatment systems has long been a favored option for remedial actions because of its proven performance in the clean-up of transportation spills, waste sites, runoff from chemical warehouse fires and many types of groundwater pollution. Carbon adsorption is fundamentally a concentration technology. It will, for example, preferentially concentrate organics. Following its use, the carbon is usually transported offsite for thermal regeneration (mobile regeneration is not generally available) or landfilled if certain contaminants such as PCBs are on the carbon. Most remediation projects are temporary in nature and involve removing contamination from finite areas to attain specific pollutant limits. The best way to approach these circumstances is to utilize mobile, rapidly deployed, modular units. With mobile pretreatment equipment, the field engineer can solve problems with control over cost and system performance.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
O.H. Materials, Inc, Findley, O.H.
OSTI Identifier:
5839496
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5839496
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Pollut. Eng.; (United States); Journal Volume: XVI:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; WASTE PROCESSING; POLLUTANTS; ADSORPTION; TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION; CARBON; CONTROL; COST; IN-SITU PROCESSING; PERFORMANCE; PORTABLE EQUIPMENT; WASTE DISPOSAL; ELEMENTS; EQUIPMENT; MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS; NONMETALS; PROCESSING; SORPTION; WASTE MANAGEMENT 320305* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Industrial & Agricultural Processes-- Industrial Waste Management

Citation Formats

Githens, G.D. Carbon adsorption onsite for remedial actions. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Githens, G.D. Carbon adsorption onsite for remedial actions. United States.
Githens, G.D. Sun . "Carbon adsorption onsite for remedial actions". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5839496,
title = {Carbon adsorption onsite for remedial actions},
author = {Githens, G.D.},
abstractNote = {Environmental remediation options range from various offsite disposal methods to onsite concentration, treatment or storage. Onsite treatment using mobile carbon adsorption treatment systems has long been a favored option for remedial actions because of its proven performance in the clean-up of transportation spills, waste sites, runoff from chemical warehouse fires and many types of groundwater pollution. Carbon adsorption is fundamentally a concentration technology. It will, for example, preferentially concentrate organics. Following its use, the carbon is usually transported offsite for thermal regeneration (mobile regeneration is not generally available) or landfilled if certain contaminants such as PCBs are on the carbon. Most remediation projects are temporary in nature and involve removing contamination from finite areas to attain specific pollutant limits. The best way to approach these circumstances is to utilize mobile, rapidly deployed, modular units. With mobile pretreatment equipment, the field engineer can solve problems with control over cost and system performance.},
doi = {},
journal = {Pollut. Eng.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = XVI:1,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1984},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1984}
}
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