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Title: A Fisheries Evaluation of the Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility, Spring 1985 Annual Report.

Abstract

The Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility (Sunnyside Screens) is part of a joint project by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation to construct fish passage and protective facilities at existing irrigation diversions in the Yakima River Basin. This report summarizes the evaluation of the work conducted at the Sunnyside Screens. About 4000 chinook salmon, Oncorhyncus tshawytscha, and 2000 steelhead, Salmo gairdneri, smolts were released in front of or within the Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility. We caught 3625 chinook salmon and less than 2% were descaled or dead. We captured 507 of the steelhead and none were descaled or dead. The Sunnyside Screens are in the Sunnyside Canal, about 360 m downstream of the Sunnyside Dam on the Yakima River (river kilometer 167). The screening facility diverts fish that have entered the canal back into the Yakima River. Descaling and mortality data were gathered by releasing branded fish into the canal, upstream of the facility, and capturing them before they returned to the river. Captured fish were anesthetized and examined for descaling that occurred during passage through the screening facility.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Bonneville Power Administration
OSTI Identifier:
5839176
Report Number(s):
DOE/BP-01830-1
ON: DE86011442
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; FISH PASSAGE FACILITIES; EVALUATION; ANADROMOUS FISHES; COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN; INJURIES; RIVERS; WASHINGTON; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; FEDERAL REGION X; FISHES; NORTH AMERICA; STREAMS; SURFACE WATERS; USA; VERTEBRATES; Steelhead (Fish) - Mortality; Fish screens; 130600* - Hydro Energy- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Neitttel, D.A., Abernethy, C.S., Lusty, E.W., and Prohammer, L.A. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility, Spring 1985 Annual Report.. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.2172/5839176.
Neitttel, D.A., Abernethy, C.S., Lusty, E.W., & Prohammer, L.A. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility, Spring 1985 Annual Report.. United States. doi:10.2172/5839176.
Neitttel, D.A., Abernethy, C.S., Lusty, E.W., and Prohammer, L.A. 1986. "A Fisheries Evaluation of the Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility, Spring 1985 Annual Report.". United States. doi:10.2172/5839176. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5839176.
@article{osti_5839176,
title = {A Fisheries Evaluation of the Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility, Spring 1985 Annual Report.},
author = {Neitttel, D.A. and Abernethy, C.S. and Lusty, E.W. and Prohammer, L.A.},
abstractNote = {The Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility (Sunnyside Screens) is part of a joint project by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation to construct fish passage and protective facilities at existing irrigation diversions in the Yakima River Basin. This report summarizes the evaluation of the work conducted at the Sunnyside Screens. About 4000 chinook salmon, Oncorhyncus tshawytscha, and 2000 steelhead, Salmo gairdneri, smolts were released in front of or within the Sunnyside Canal Fish Screening Facility. We caught 3625 chinook salmon and less than 2% were descaled or dead. We captured 507 of the steelhead and none were descaled or dead. The Sunnyside Screens are in the Sunnyside Canal, about 360 m downstream of the Sunnyside Dam on the Yakima River (river kilometer 167). The screening facility diverts fish that have entered the canal back into the Yakima River. Descaling and mortality data were gathered by releasing branded fish into the canal, upstream of the facility, and capturing them before they returned to the river. Captured fish were anesthetized and examined for descaling that occurred during passage through the screening facility.},
doi = {10.2172/5839176},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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  • We evaluated the effectiveness of new screening facilities at the Toppenish Creek, Wapato, and Sunnyside canals in southcentral Washington State. Screen integrity tests indicated that fish released in front of the screens were prevented from entering the canal behind the screens. Screen efficiency estimates are 99% ({+-}0.6%) for Toppenish Creek, 99% ({+-}0.3%) for Wapato, and 98% ({+-}0.5%) for Sunnyside. During 1987 at the Wapato Canal, we estimated screen efficiency was 97% ({+-}l%). We conducted descaling tests at the Toppenish Creek Screens. We estimated that 0.2% of steelhead Qncorhynchus mykiss smelts released during tests were descaled. None of the fish releasedmore » through the fish return pipe were descaled. We measured the time required for fish to move through the screen facilities. The time required for 50% of the test fish to exit the Toppenish Creek Screen forebay was 4 to 9 h for rainbow trout fry and up to 39 h for steelhead smelts. The time for 50% of the test fish to exit the Wapato and Sunnyside screen forebays was less than 8 h. As with past studies, exit times varied with canal flow and species. After 39 h at Toppenish Creek, half the steelhead smelts were still in the forebay when canal flows were 20 cfs. At Sunnyside, half the chinook salmon fry exited the forebay in 1 h or less. Methods used in 1988 were the same as those used at Sunnyside in 1985 and in subsequent years at Richland, Toppenish/Satus, and Wapato. The methods and previous results have been reviewed by the Washington State Department of Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Power Planning Council, and Yakima Indian Nation.« less
  • The Bonneville Power Administration, the United States Bureau of Reclamation, and the Washington State Department of Ecology are funding the construction and evaluation of fish passage and protection facilities at irrigation and hydroelectric diversions in the Yakima River Basin, Washington State. The programs provide offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric development throughout the Columbia River Basin and address natural propagation of salmon to help mitigate the impact of irrigation in the Yakima River Basin. The Wapato, Sunnyside, and Toppenish Creek Screens are three of the facilities in the basin. This report evaluates the effectivenessmore » of the screens in intercepting and returning juvenile salmonids unharmed to the river from which they were diverted. We evaluated the effectiveness of new screening facilities at the Toppenish Creek, Wapato, and Sunnyside canals in southcentral Washington State. Screen integrity tests indicated that fish released in front of the screens were prevented from entering the canal behind the screens. We conducted descaling tests at the Toppenish Creek Screens. We measured the time required for fish to move through the screen facilities. Methods used in 1988 were the same as those used at Sunnyside in 1985 and in subsequent years at Richland. Toppenish/Satus, and Wapato. 11 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.« less
  • We evaluated the effectiveness of new fish screening facilities in the Westside Ditch and Wapato Canal in south-central Washington State. The screen integrity tests indicated that test fish released in front of the screens could enter the canal behind the screens. At Westside Ditch, between 6% and 25% of the zero-age fry passed through the rotary drum screens. The 6% estimate is based on tests with rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fry. The 25% estimate is based on monitoring chinook salmon 0. tshawytscha fry that were diverted from the river into the irrigation ditch. At Westside Ditch, we estimated that 1.8%more » of steelhead 0. mykiss smolts and 0.3% of chinook salmon smolts released during tests were descaled. The time required for 50% of the test fish to exit from the Westside Ditch Screen forebay was 3 to 8 h for chinook salmon smolts and up to 28 h for steelhead smolts. Methods used in 1988 were first used at Sunnyside in 1985 and were used in subsequent years at Richland. Toppenish/Satus. Wapato. and Toppenish Creek. The methods and 1985 through 1987 results have been reviewed by the Washington State Department of Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Yakima Indian Nation.« less
  • We evaluated the effectiveness of new fish screening facilities at the Richland and Wapato canals in south-central Washington State. The screen integrity tests at the Richland Screens indicated that 100% of fall chinook salmon fry (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) released in front of the screens were prevented from entering the canal behind the screens. Our estimate is based on a 61% catch efficiency for control fish planted behind the screens. At the Wapato Canal, we estimated that between 3% and 4% of the test fish were either impinged on the screen surface and passed over the screens or passed through faulty screenmore » seals. Our estimate is based over the screens or passed through faulty screen seals. Our estimate is based on a greater than 90% capture of control fish released in front of the screens. At the Wapato Screens, we estimated that 0.8% of steelhead smolts (Salmo gairdneri) and 1.4% of spring chinook salmon smolts released during low canal flow tests wee descaled. During full canal flow tests, 1.6% of the steelhead and 3.1% of the spring chinook salmon released were descaled. The fish return pipe at the Wapato Canal was tested: the estimate of descaled test fish wa not different from the estimate of descaled control fish. The time required for fish to exit from the Wapato Screen forebay varied with species and with canal flow. During low canal flows, 43.2% of steelhead and 61.6% of spring chinook salmon smolts released at the trash racks were captured in the fish return within 96 hr. 11 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.« less
  • The fisheries evaluation phase of diversion screen effectiveness summarizes the results of work at the Richland and Toppenish/Satus Fish screening facilities (Richland Screens and Toppenish/Satus Screens) during 1986. More than 10,000 steelhead, Salmo gairdneri, and chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, were released at the screen diversions. At the Richland Screens, 61% of the released steelhead were recovered and 1.1% were descaled; 93% of the spring chinook salmon were recovered and less than 1% were descaled. At the Toppenish/Satus Screens, only steelhead were evaluated for descaling; 88.9% were recovered and 23.9% were descaled. Only steelhead were evaluated because the Yakima River fisheriesmore » managers did not expect any other smolts to occur in Toppenish Creek. Because of the acclimation conditions and the amount of time the fish had to be held before testing, some of the test population were descaled during holding and transportation. The 23.9% descaling for the test fish was compared to 26.4% for the controls.« less