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Title: GRAIL seeks out genes buried in DNA sequence

Abstract

When the Human Genome Project achieves its ultimate goal, supposedly around 2005, biologists will have in hand the exact sequence of all 3 billion nucleotides arrayed along the human chromosomes. But they have never been entirely sure how they will read the language of the long string of As, Gs, Ts, and Cs. How will they even be able to pick out the genes, which account for a mere 5% of the genome, from the mass of letters in between Now Edward Ubergacher, a biophysicist-turned-computational-biologist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has come one step toward providing an answer: a new artificial intelligence program, called GRAIL, that can pick out the coding regions of genes in a long stretch of sequence data. So far, the Oak Ridge team has analyzed 5 million bases of DNA. One year ago, even 6 months ago, it was virtually impossible to go into human genomic sequence and find genes by computer with any reliability. Now we can go in and find 90% of the genes very quickly. GRAIL can be used on a PC, not a supercomputer, and it provides an answer almost instantly.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5821052
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Science (Washington, D.C.); (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 254:5033; Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; GENES; G CODES; GENETIC MAPPING; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; CHROMOSOMES; DNA SEQUENCING; MAN; NUCLEOTIDES; ORNL; ANIMALS; COMPUTER CODES; MAMMALS; MAPPING; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PRIMATES; STRUCTURAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; US AEC; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS; VERTEBRATES; 550400* - Genetics

Citation Formats

Roberts, L. GRAIL seeks out genes buried in DNA sequence. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.1126/science.1948063.
Roberts, L. GRAIL seeks out genes buried in DNA sequence. United States. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1948063
Roberts, L. Fri . "GRAIL seeks out genes buried in DNA sequence". United States. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1948063.
@article{osti_5821052,
title = {GRAIL seeks out genes buried in DNA sequence},
author = {Roberts, L},
abstractNote = {When the Human Genome Project achieves its ultimate goal, supposedly around 2005, biologists will have in hand the exact sequence of all 3 billion nucleotides arrayed along the human chromosomes. But they have never been entirely sure how they will read the language of the long string of As, Gs, Ts, and Cs. How will they even be able to pick out the genes, which account for a mere 5% of the genome, from the mass of letters in between Now Edward Ubergacher, a biophysicist-turned-computational-biologist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has come one step toward providing an answer: a new artificial intelligence program, called GRAIL, that can pick out the coding regions of genes in a long stretch of sequence data. So far, the Oak Ridge team has analyzed 5 million bases of DNA. One year ago, even 6 months ago, it was virtually impossible to go into human genomic sequence and find genes by computer with any reliability. Now we can go in and find 90% of the genes very quickly. GRAIL can be used on a PC, not a supercomputer, and it provides an answer almost instantly.},
doi = {10.1126/science.1948063},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5821052}, journal = {Science (Washington, D.C.); (United States)},
issn = {0036-8075},
number = ,
volume = 254:5033,
place = {United States},
year = {1991},
month = {11}
}