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Title: An evaluation of the effects of geothermal energy development on aquatic biota in the Geysers area of California. Technical completion report

Abstract

The Geysers of Sonoma County, California, currently the largest geothermal energy field in the world, is expected to expand its electrical generating capacity considerably in the coming years. However, these future developments may result in watershed modification and potentially deleterious effects on aquatic biota due to the topography of the area. Analysis of the response of benthic populations and communities to past and ongoing geothermal energy development and operational practices was undertaken by means of an extensive six site sampling program on Big Sulfur Creek and a concentrated colonization study above, in, and below a heavily impacted tributary (Little Geysers Creek). Differences in species diversity were noted among the six Big Sulfur Creek sites that were selected relative to the presence or absence of natural fumaroles or hot springs and the absence or stage of geothermal energy development. Distribution and colonization patterns of a population of caddisfly, Gumaga nigricula, and especially its dominance in high silt areas, suggest that both siltation and fumarole activity may select for certain populations.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Div. of Entomology and Parasitology (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5815619
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5815619
Report Number(s):
PB-293031
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEYSERS GEOTHERMAL FIELD; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT; ABUNDANCE; AMMONIA; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; CALIFORNIA; ECOLOGY; FUMAROLES; GEYSERS; HOT SPRINGS; INSECTS; METALS; MONITORING; SALINITY; SILT; SULFATES; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; TOXICITY; WATER QUALITY; ANIMALS; ARTHROPODS; ECOSYSTEMS; ELEMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; HYDRIDES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INVERTEBRATES; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN HYDRIDES; NORTH AMERICA; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; THERMAL SPRINGS; USA; WESTERN REGION 150600* -- Geothermal Energy-- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Resh, V.H., Flynn, T.S., Lamberti, G.A., and McElravy, E. An evaluation of the effects of geothermal energy development on aquatic biota in the Geysers area of California. Technical completion report. United States: N. p., 1979. Web.
Resh, V.H., Flynn, T.S., Lamberti, G.A., & McElravy, E. An evaluation of the effects of geothermal energy development on aquatic biota in the Geysers area of California. Technical completion report. United States.
Resh, V.H., Flynn, T.S., Lamberti, G.A., and McElravy, E. Thu . "An evaluation of the effects of geothermal energy development on aquatic biota in the Geysers area of California. Technical completion report". United States.
@article{osti_5815619,
title = {An evaluation of the effects of geothermal energy development on aquatic biota in the Geysers area of California. Technical completion report},
author = {Resh, V.H. and Flynn, T.S. and Lamberti, G.A. and McElravy, E.},
abstractNote = {The Geysers of Sonoma County, California, currently the largest geothermal energy field in the world, is expected to expand its electrical generating capacity considerably in the coming years. However, these future developments may result in watershed modification and potentially deleterious effects on aquatic biota due to the topography of the area. Analysis of the response of benthic populations and communities to past and ongoing geothermal energy development and operational practices was undertaken by means of an extensive six site sampling program on Big Sulfur Creek and a concentrated colonization study above, in, and below a heavily impacted tributary (Little Geysers Creek). Differences in species diversity were noted among the six Big Sulfur Creek sites that were selected relative to the presence or absence of natural fumaroles or hot springs and the absence or stage of geothermal energy development. Distribution and colonization patterns of a population of caddisfly, Gumaga nigricula, and especially its dominance in high silt areas, suggest that both siltation and fumarole activity may select for certain populations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}

Technical Report:
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