skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Kinetic and bioenergetic studies of Spirulina platensis in chemostat and turbidostat culture

Abstract

The growth kinetics and bioenergetics of S. platensis were investigated as a function of pH, temperature, light intensity, and HCO/sub 3/ concentration. The effects of pH and temperature on growth rate and bioenergetic yield were examined using turbidostat operation. The Arrhenius activation energy for growth appears to be independent of light intensity for the range of values that were investigated. Under light-limited growth conditions, the values of pH and temperature which provide for the maximum growth rate also correspond to the maximum bioenergetic yield. Chemostat operation was used to investigate C-limited growth.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (ed.)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Kansas State Univ., Manhatten, KS 66506, USA. Dept. of Chemical Engineering
OSTI Identifier:
5811719
Report Number(s):
CONF-860508-
Journal ID: CODEN: BIBSB
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biotechnol. Bioeng. Symp.; (United States); Journal Volume: 17; Conference: 8. symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals, Gatlinburg, TN, USA, 13 May 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; ALGAE; PLANT GROWTH; ACTIVATION ENERGY; ARRHENIUS EQUATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOREACTORS; CARBON; CARBONIC ACID DERIVATIVES; CELL CULTURES; CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; ENERGY BUDGETS; GROWTH; LIMITING VALUES; PH VALUE; PHOTOPERIOD; QUANTITY RATIO; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TESTING; TURBIDITY; VISIBLE RADIATION; YIELDS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELEMENTS; ENERGY; EQUATIONS; KINETICS; NONMETALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PLANTS; RADIATIONS; REACTION KINETICS 140504* -- Solar Energy Conversion-- Biomass Production & Conversion-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Lee, H.Y., Erickson, L.E., and Scott, C.D.. Kinetic and bioenergetic studies of Spirulina platensis in chemostat and turbidostat culture. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Lee, H.Y., Erickson, L.E., & Scott, C.D.. Kinetic and bioenergetic studies of Spirulina platensis in chemostat and turbidostat culture. United States.
Lee, H.Y., Erickson, L.E., and Scott, C.D.. 1986. "Kinetic and bioenergetic studies of Spirulina platensis in chemostat and turbidostat culture". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5811719,
title = {Kinetic and bioenergetic studies of Spirulina platensis in chemostat and turbidostat culture},
author = {Lee, H.Y. and Erickson, L.E. and Scott, C.D.},
abstractNote = {The growth kinetics and bioenergetics of S. platensis were investigated as a function of pH, temperature, light intensity, and HCO/sub 3/ concentration. The effects of pH and temperature on growth rate and bioenergetic yield were examined using turbidostat operation. The Arrhenius activation energy for growth appears to be independent of light intensity for the range of values that were investigated. Under light-limited growth conditions, the values of pH and temperature which provide for the maximum growth rate also correspond to the maximum bioenergetic yield. Chemostat operation was used to investigate C-limited growth.},
doi = {},
journal = {Biotechnol. Bioeng. Symp.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • The characteristics of the protein of fresh-water, mass-cultured Spirulina platensis have been studied. The solubility of this algal protein in water and various aqueous solvents has been estimated. The total protein content of the blue-green algae was approximately 50-55% of which nearly 9.9% was nonprotein nitrogen. About 80% of the total protein nitrogen can be extracted by three successive extractions with water. Ths isoelectric point of this algal protein is found to be 3.0. The total proteins were characterized physicochemically by standard techniques. In the ultracentrifuge total proteins resolve into two major components with S20w values of 2.6 and 4.7more » S. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic pattern of the total protein showed seven bands including three prominent ones. The in vitro digestibility of the total protein of fresh algae was found to be 85% when assayed with a pepsin-pancreatin system.« less
  • The objective of this article is to determine the yield and chemical composition of the biomass of Spirulina maxima cultures incubated in different concentrations of sodium chloride in steady state.
  • The growth of a mixed culture was studied in a two-stage chemostat with growth limited by phenolics. The first stage provided a fully viable, adapted population that was fed at a constant rate to the second stage, where the concentration of phenolics could be varied. The population exhibited inhibition kinetics at high concentrations of phenolics. The viability of the culture decreased with increasing dilution rate, or with increasing phenolic concentration. The nonviable population did not utilize significant amounts of substrate, but ignoring viability can lead to a significant underestimate of the growth rate. The maintenance requirements were insignificant at noninhibitorymore » levels of phenolics, but rose to 0.15 g/g{center dot}h at inhibitory levels, possibly due to the need to repair damaged cell membranes.« less
  • The photosynthetic performance of a helical tubular photobioreactor (``Biocoil``), incorporating the filamentous cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, was investigated. The photobioreactor was constructed in a cylindrical shape with a 0.25-m{sup 2} basal area and a photostage comprising 60 m of transparent PVC tubing of 1.6-cm inner diameter. The inner surface of the cylinder was illuminated with cool white fluorescent lamps; the energy input of photosynthetically active radiation into the photobioreactor was 2,920 kJ per day. An air-lift system incorporating 4% CO{sub 2} was used to circulate the growth medium in the tubing. The maximum productivity achieved in batch culture was 7.18 gmore » dry biomass per day which corresponded to a photosynthetic (PAR) efficiency of 5.45%. The CO{sub 2} was efficiently removed from the gaseous stream; monitoring the CO{sub 2} in the outlet and inlet gas streams showed a 70% removal of CO{sub 2} from the inlet gas over an 8-h period with almost maximum growth rate.« less