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Title: Computed tomography of localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts

Abstract

Twenty-nine patients showed localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts on computed tomography, usually unaccompanied by jaundice. Congenital dilatation was diagnosed when associated with a choledochal cyst, while cholangiographic contrast material was helpful in differentiating such dilatation from a simple cyst by showing its communication with the biliary tract when no choledochal cyst was present. Obstructive dilatation was associated with intrahepatic calculi in 4 cases, hepatoma in 9, cholangioma in 5, metastatic tumor in 5, and polycystic disease in 2. Cholangioma and intrahepatic calculi had a greater tendency to accompany such localized dilatation; in 2 cases, the dilatation was the only clue to the underlying disorder.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Tokyo, Japan
OSTI Identifier:
5799573
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiology; (United States); Journal Volume: 141:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BILIARY TRACT; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; NEOPLASMS; DIAGNOSIS; LIVER; METASTASES; PATIENTS; BODY; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DISEASES; GLANDS; ORGANS; TOMOGRAPHY; 550602* - Medicine- External Radiation in Diagnostics- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Araki, T., Itai Y., and Tasaka, A.. Computed tomography of localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. United States: N. p., 1981. Web. doi:10.1148/radiology.141.3.6272354.
Araki, T., Itai Y., & Tasaka, A.. Computed tomography of localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. United States. doi:10.1148/radiology.141.3.6272354.
Araki, T., Itai Y., and Tasaka, A.. 1981. "Computed tomography of localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts". United States. doi:10.1148/radiology.141.3.6272354.
@article{osti_5799573,
title = {Computed tomography of localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts},
author = {Araki, T. and Itai Y. and Tasaka, A.},
abstractNote = {Twenty-nine patients showed localized dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts on computed tomography, usually unaccompanied by jaundice. Congenital dilatation was diagnosed when associated with a choledochal cyst, while cholangiographic contrast material was helpful in differentiating such dilatation from a simple cyst by showing its communication with the biliary tract when no choledochal cyst was present. Obstructive dilatation was associated with intrahepatic calculi in 4 cases, hepatoma in 9, cholangioma in 5, metastatic tumor in 5, and polycystic disease in 2. Cholangioma and intrahepatic calculi had a greater tendency to accompany such localized dilatation; in 2 cases, the dilatation was the only clue to the underlying disorder.},
doi = {10.1148/radiology.141.3.6272354},
journal = {Radiology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 141:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month =
}
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