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Title: Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites

Abstract

Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi). 1 reference, 2 tables.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, AL
OSTI Identifier:
5789126
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: SAMPE Q.; (United States); Journal Volume: 16:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; FABRICATION; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; ARAMIDS; NEOPRENE; ELASTOMERS; MATERIALS; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC POLYMERS; PETROCHEMICALS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; PLASTICS; POLYMERS; SYNTHETIC MATERIALS 360301* -- Composite Materials-- Preparation & Fabrication-- (-1987); 360303 -- Composite Materials-- Mechanical Properties-- (-1987); 360401 -- Polymers & Plastics-- Preparation & Fabrication-- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Penn, B.G., Daniels, J.G., White, W.T., Thompson, L.M., and Clemons, L.M.. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Penn, B.G., Daniels, J.G., White, W.T., Thompson, L.M., & Clemons, L.M.. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites. United States.
Penn, B.G., Daniels, J.G., White, W.T., Thompson, L.M., and Clemons, L.M.. 1985. "Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5789126,
title = {Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites},
author = {Penn, B.G. and Daniels, J.G. and White, W.T. and Thompson, L.M. and Clemons, L.M.},
abstractNote = {Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi). 1 reference, 2 tables.},
doi = {},
journal = {SAMPE Q.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 16:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 4
}
  • The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shearmore » forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.« less
  • Characteristics of advanced composites are investigated. The fibers considered are Kevlar and carbon. The greatest advantage of composites over metals is emphasized, and lies in their permitting designers to obtain properties in exactly the locations desired. Kevlar replaced S-glass on the Trident 2 missile, saving 800 lbs. and adding 800 miles to its range. Military aircraft builders find that advanced carbon composites more often than not win out over Kevlar.
  • This paper treats the mechanical behavior of hybrid (Thornel P-55-Kevlar/Epoxy) composites under ambient conditions and under hostile environments. Interply (core/shell) and intraply tubes (5.75'' I.D.) were filament wound and NOL rings were machined from them. Apparently modulus and apparent strength were measured using the split D (ASTM D2290) test. The influence of boiling water exposure (2 hrs and 24 hrs) on short beam shear strength, apparent modulus, and apparent strength was also evaluated at room temperature and the fracture toughness for above configurations was measured at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine failure modes. 6 references, 4more » figures, 3 tables.« less
  • The effect of temperature changes on the compressive characteristics of Kevlar 49-epoxy composites were investigated. Using published data on the elastic properties of Kevlar 49 fiber and a typical epoxy matrix and the equation for the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) developed by Schapery (1968) and Nairn (1985) for isotropic and transversely isotropic fibers, respectively, the temperature change required to cause compressive failure of the fiber was calculated for various volume fractions; it was found that, for typical unidirectional composites, thermally induced compressive failure of Kevlar fibers is of little concern. However, a temperature reduction places the curved fiber in themore » fabric-reinforced composite in axial compression, adding to the bending strain in the fiber. The combination of thermal stresses and external compressive loads that are below ultimate values by themselves can cause local compresive failure of the fiber. In addition, the kink bands formed as a result of compressive failure of Kevlar fiber are expected to cause debonding between fiber and matrix, and thus are also potential sites for crack initiation. 14 references.« less
  • The relationship betwen specimen thickness and tensile strength in Kevlar 49 composites following exposure to ultraviolet light is investigated. Specimens of 0.13, 0.25, and 0.50 mm thickness molded from one, two, and four layers of Fiberdux 914k-49-5 prepreg are exposed to ultraviolet light in a Spectrotest apparatus, which has a low pressure xenon burner with a spectral range of 0.29-0.60 microns, for 500 and 1000 hours. The tensile stiffness and tensile strength data reveal that the ultraviolet light caused a decrease in the tensile strength and tensile retention of the 0.13 mm (1 ply) specimen; however, the 0.25 mm (2more » plies) and 0.50 mm (4 plies) specimens, and the initial tensile elastic modulus for each specimen are unaffected by the exposure.« less