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Title: Project management controls

Abstract

Project management controls are utilized to enhance the probability that a project will be successful. The control system used by a project manager can take many forms and can be applied at different times to varying degrees on a given project depending upon its complexity. The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is one project of many at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The United States Department of Energy Order 4700.1 is a project management system that is applied on a site-wide basis, thus including the CIF. The control system required by this order is proceduralized to ensure that it is applied in a consistent manner and will produce reliable results. These results provide the project manager with a correlation of both costs and schedule within the defined scope to adequately asses the status of the project. This is an iterative process and can be simply stated: plan, actual, variance, corrective action, prediction, and revision. This paper presents the basis for the project management controls applied at the Savannah River Site.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. (Bechtel Savannah River Inc., Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States))
  2. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5788663
Report Number(s):
WSRC-MS-90-311; CONF-910559-8
ON: DE92009842
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-89SR18035
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 10. annual international incineration conference: environmental concerns and controls, Knoxville, TN (United States), 13-17 May 1991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; ACCOUNTING; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES; BUDGETS; MANAGEMENT; PERMIT APPLICATIONS; PLANNING; SCHEDULES; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; US AEC; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; 052000* - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Management; 056000 - Nuclear Fuels- Legislation & Regulations- (1987-); 990100 - Management

Citation Formats

Hardin, D.S., and Carnes, W.S. Project management controls. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Hardin, D.S., & Carnes, W.S. Project management controls. United States.
Hardin, D.S., and Carnes, W.S. 1990. "Project management controls". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5788663.
@article{osti_5788663,
title = {Project management controls},
author = {Hardin, D.S. and Carnes, W.S.},
abstractNote = {Project management controls are utilized to enhance the probability that a project will be successful. The control system used by a project manager can take many forms and can be applied at different times to varying degrees on a given project depending upon its complexity. The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is one project of many at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The United States Department of Energy Order 4700.1 is a project management system that is applied on a site-wide basis, thus including the CIF. The control system required by this order is proceduralized to ensure that it is applied in a consistent manner and will produce reliable results. These results provide the project manager with a correlation of both costs and schedule within the defined scope to adequately asses the status of the project. This is an iterative process and can be simply stated: plan, actual, variance, corrective action, prediction, and revision. This paper presents the basis for the project management controls applied at the Savannah River Site.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
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