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Title: Inverted flat plate solar collector. Final report

Abstract

Construction and testing of an inverted flat plate solar collector are described. Heat transfer and economic analysis were performed to optimize the collector design. The newly designed collector was tested against two other flat plate collectors and the results and comparison of efficiencies are presented. (BCS)

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brown (Michael A.), Columbia, MD (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5788523
Report Number(s):
DOE/R3/06057-T1
ON: DE85009259
DOE Contract Number:
FG43-79R306057
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Microfiche only, copy does not permit paper copy reproduction
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; FLAT PLATE COLLECTORS; DESIGN; EFFICIENCY; TESTING; COST; FLOW RATE; GLAZING; INSOLATION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; ORIENTATION; PYRANOMETERS; SOLAR ABSORBERS; SOLAR REFLECTORS; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT; COVERINGS; EQUIPMENT; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; SOLAR COLLECTORS; SOLAR CONCENTRATORS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; 141000* - Solar Collectors & Concentrators

Citation Formats

Brown, M.A.. Inverted flat plate solar collector. Final report. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Brown, M.A.. Inverted flat plate solar collector. Final report. United States.
Brown, M.A.. 1981. "Inverted flat plate solar collector. Final report". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5788523,
title = {Inverted flat plate solar collector. Final report},
author = {Brown, M.A.},
abstractNote = {Construction and testing of an inverted flat plate solar collector are described. Heat transfer and economic analysis were performed to optimize the collector design. The newly designed collector was tested against two other flat plate collectors and the results and comparison of efficiencies are presented. (BCS)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:
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  • The design of a flat plate solar collector that meets an allowable cost constraint is studied. The cost constraint is $5 to 6 per square foot. A medium-temperature collector prototype with a non-thin film absorber was constructed and tested. (BCS)
  • Twenty candidate sealants representing ten different polymer types were evaluated as potential solar collector sealants. Polymer types tested included epichlorohydrin rubber, EPDM rubber, silicone, polysulfide, acrylate rubber, and a fluoroelastomer. Initial screening of sealants consisted of measuring high temperature stability and adhesion retention. Several sealant compositions exhibited satisfactory performance in these tests and were selected for further evaluation. These materials were based on an EPDM rubber, a Viton fluoroelastomer, and silicone polymers. Further testing of these candidate materials included determination of adhesion retention under uv/water/heat conditions, fogging temperature, low temperature flexibility, and physical properties. Four silicone-based materials appeared to bemore » suitable candidates for sealing solar collectors. These include Dow Corning 90-006-02 and 3120, General Electric 1200, and PR-1939 from Products Research and Chemical Corporation.« less
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