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Title: Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States

Abstract

In 2988 the Congress requested DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. This report presents the results of that study. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity), and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiactively important gases. Topics discussed include: energy and environmental technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, fossil energy production and electricity generation technologies, nuclear energy technology, renewable energy technologies, energy storage, transmission, and distribution technology, transportation, technology, industrial technology, residential and commercial building technology, greenhouse gas removal technology, approaches to restructuring the demand for energy.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. eds.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Analysis
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5775139
Report Number(s):
DOE/PE-0101-Vol.1
ON: DE92007593
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Report to the Congress of the United States
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; EMISSION; INFORMATION; REMOVAL; GREENHOUSE GASES; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; COST; ENERGY DEMAND; ENERGY STORAGE; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; FOSSIL FUELS; INDUSTRY; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; NUCLEAR POWER; POWER GENERATION; POWER TRANSMISSION; RENEWABLE RESOURCES; RESIDENTIAL SECTOR; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; TRANSPORTATION SECTOR; BUILDINGS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; DEMAND; ENERGY SOURCES; FUELS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POWER; RESOURCES; STORAGE; 290300* - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety; 540120 - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Bradley, R A, Watts, E C, and Williams, E R. Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.2172/5775139.
Bradley, R A, Watts, E C, & Williams, E R. Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. United States. doi:10.2172/5775139.
Bradley, R A, Watts, E C, and Williams, E R. Sun . "Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States". United States. doi:10.2172/5775139. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5775139.
@article{osti_5775139,
title = {Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States},
author = {Bradley, R A and Watts, E C and Williams, E R},
abstractNote = {In 2988 the Congress requested DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. This report presents the results of that study. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity), and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiactively important gases. Topics discussed include: energy and environmental technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, fossil energy production and electricity generation technologies, nuclear energy technology, renewable energy technologies, energy storage, transmission, and distribution technology, transportation, technology, industrial technology, residential and commercial building technology, greenhouse gas removal technology, approaches to restructuring the demand for energy.},
doi = {10.2172/5775139},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1991},
month = {Sun Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1991}
}

Technical Report:

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