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Title: Indicators of recent environmental change in Alaska

Abstract

Climate models predict that global warming due to the effects of increasing trace gases will be amplified in northern high latitude regions, including Alaska. Several environmental indicators, including tree-ring based temperature reconstructions, borcal forest growth measurements and observations of glacial retreat all indicate that the general warming of the past century has been significant relative to prior centuries to millenia. The tree-ring records for central and northern Alaska indicate that annual temperature increased over the past century, peaked in the 1940s, and are still near the highest level for the past three centuries (Jacoby and D`Arrigo 1995). The tree-ring analyses also suggest that drought stress may now be a factor limiting growth at many northern sites. The recent warming combined with drier years may be altering the response of tree growth to climate and raising the likelihood of forest changes in Alaska and other boreal forests. Other tree-ring and forest data from southern and interior Alaska provide indices of the response of vegetation to extreme events (e.g., insect outbreaks, snow events) in Alaska (Juday and marler 1996). Historical maps, field measurements and satellite imagery indicate that Alaskan glaciers have receded over the past century (e.g., Hall and Benson 1996). Severemore » outbreaks of bark beetles may be on the increase due to warming, which can shorten their reproductive cycle. Such data and understanding of causes are useful for policy makers and others interested in evaluation of possible impacts of trace-gas induced warming and environmental change in the United States.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
577349
Report Number(s):
CONF-970522-
TRN: 98:000898-0097
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 8. global warming international conference and expo, New York, NY (United States), 25-28 May 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of 8th Global warming international conference and exposition; PB: 156 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GREENHOUSE GASES; CLIMATIC CHANGE; AIR POLLUTION; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; ALASKA; BARK; CLIMATE MODELS; FORESTS; GLACIERS; SNOW

Citation Formats

Jacoby, G C, D`Arrigo, R D, and Juday, G. Indicators of recent environmental change in Alaska. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Jacoby, G C, D`Arrigo, R D, & Juday, G. Indicators of recent environmental change in Alaska. United States.
Jacoby, G C, D`Arrigo, R D, and Juday, G. 1997. "Indicators of recent environmental change in Alaska". United States.
@article{osti_577349,
title = {Indicators of recent environmental change in Alaska},
author = {Jacoby, G C and D`Arrigo, R D and Juday, G},
abstractNote = {Climate models predict that global warming due to the effects of increasing trace gases will be amplified in northern high latitude regions, including Alaska. Several environmental indicators, including tree-ring based temperature reconstructions, borcal forest growth measurements and observations of glacial retreat all indicate that the general warming of the past century has been significant relative to prior centuries to millenia. The tree-ring records for central and northern Alaska indicate that annual temperature increased over the past century, peaked in the 1940s, and are still near the highest level for the past three centuries (Jacoby and D`Arrigo 1995). The tree-ring analyses also suggest that drought stress may now be a factor limiting growth at many northern sites. The recent warming combined with drier years may be altering the response of tree growth to climate and raising the likelihood of forest changes in Alaska and other boreal forests. Other tree-ring and forest data from southern and interior Alaska provide indices of the response of vegetation to extreme events (e.g., insect outbreaks, snow events) in Alaska (Juday and marler 1996). Historical maps, field measurements and satellite imagery indicate that Alaskan glaciers have receded over the past century (e.g., Hall and Benson 1996). Severe outbreaks of bark beetles may be on the increase due to warming, which can shorten their reproductive cycle. Such data and understanding of causes are useful for policy makers and others interested in evaluation of possible impacts of trace-gas induced warming and environmental change in the United States.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/577349}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
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