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Title: Large-scale genotoxicity assessments in the marine environment

Abstract

There are a number of techniques for detecting genotoxicity in the marine environment, and many are applicable to large-scale field assessments. Certain tests can be used to evaluate responses in target organisms in situ while others utilize surrogate organisms exposed to field samples in short-term laboratory bioassays. Genotoxicity endpoints appear distinct from traditional toxicity endpoints, but some have chemical or ecotoxicologic correlates. One versatile end point, the frequency of anaphase aberrations, has been used in several large marine assessments to evaluate genotoxicity in the New York Bight, in sediment from San Francisco Bay, and following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. 31 refs., 2 tabs.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Occidental College, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
576454
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Health Perspectives; Journal Volume: 102; Journal Issue: Suppl.12; Other Information: PBD: Dec 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 02 PETROLEUM; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; GENETIC EFFECTS; TOXICITY; POLLUTANTS; TOXIC MATERIALS; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; HYDROCARBONS; SURFACE WATERS; OIL SPILLS; MITOSIS

Citation Formats

Hose, J.E. Large-scale genotoxicity assessments in the marine environment. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.1289/ehp.94102s1229a.
Hose, J.E. Large-scale genotoxicity assessments in the marine environment. United States. doi:10.1289/ehp.94102s1229a.
Hose, J.E. 1994. "Large-scale genotoxicity assessments in the marine environment". United States. doi:10.1289/ehp.94102s1229a.
@article{osti_576454,
title = {Large-scale genotoxicity assessments in the marine environment},
author = {Hose, J.E.},
abstractNote = {There are a number of techniques for detecting genotoxicity in the marine environment, and many are applicable to large-scale field assessments. Certain tests can be used to evaluate responses in target organisms in situ while others utilize surrogate organisms exposed to field samples in short-term laboratory bioassays. Genotoxicity endpoints appear distinct from traditional toxicity endpoints, but some have chemical or ecotoxicologic correlates. One versatile end point, the frequency of anaphase aberrations, has been used in several large marine assessments to evaluate genotoxicity in the New York Bight, in sediment from San Francisco Bay, and following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. 31 refs., 2 tabs.},
doi = {10.1289/ehp.94102s1229a},
journal = {Environmental Health Perspectives},
number = Suppl.12,
volume = 102,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month =
}
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