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Title: Crystalline-amorphous interfaces and their relation to grain boundary films

Abstract

In presence of glass in grain boundaries greatly enhances sintering, in part, because transport of matter along and across the intergranular regions is faster. The glass does not simply act as a catalyst but also changes the character of the interfacial regions. In particular, it tends to encourage faceting of the grains; the scale of this faceting may vary from nanometers to microns. After processing, the glass may remain as a thin layer in the interface during preparation of the polycrystalline compact as was initially demonstrated for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and proposed for other ceramics. The glass may also crystallize to form an intergranular crystalline layer or it may withdraw from the planar interfaces into three-grain and four-grain junctions (the dewetting process). The present program has begun to examine how glass affects and interacts with crystalline ceramics. The main aim of the program is to examine how glass moves into and out of grain boundaries and why this movement takes. By understanding this process we will be better able to control this important aspect of many ceramic materials. Since TEM is the main tool used in this investigation, we will continue to develop methods for analyzing interfaces as part ofmore » this program.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
5738322
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/45381-3
ON: DE92009812
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-89ER45381
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CERAMICS; INTERFACES; SINTERING; GLASS; ALUMINIUM OXIDES; AMORPHOUS STATE; GRAIN BOUNDARIES; PROGRESS REPORT; SILICON NITRIDES; ALUMINIUM COMPOUNDS; CHALCOGENIDES; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DOCUMENT TYPES; FABRICATION; MICROSTRUCTURE; NITRIDES; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PNICTIDES; SILICON COMPOUNDS; 360201* - Ceramics, Cermets, & Refractories- Preparation & Fabrication; 360202 - Ceramics, Cermets, & Refractories- Structure & Phase Studies; 360602 - Other Materials- Structure & Phase Studies

Citation Formats

Carter, C B. Crystalline-amorphous interfaces and their relation to grain boundary films. United States: N. p., 1992. Web. doi:10.2172/5738322.
Carter, C B. Crystalline-amorphous interfaces and their relation to grain boundary films. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/5738322
Carter, C B. Mon . "Crystalline-amorphous interfaces and their relation to grain boundary films". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/5738322. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5738322.
@article{osti_5738322,
title = {Crystalline-amorphous interfaces and their relation to grain boundary films},
author = {Carter, C B},
abstractNote = {In presence of glass in grain boundaries greatly enhances sintering, in part, because transport of matter along and across the intergranular regions is faster. The glass does not simply act as a catalyst but also changes the character of the interfacial regions. In particular, it tends to encourage faceting of the grains; the scale of this faceting may vary from nanometers to microns. After processing, the glass may remain as a thin layer in the interface during preparation of the polycrystalline compact as was initially demonstrated for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and proposed for other ceramics. The glass may also crystallize to form an intergranular crystalline layer or it may withdraw from the planar interfaces into three-grain and four-grain junctions (the dewetting process). The present program has begun to examine how glass affects and interacts with crystalline ceramics. The main aim of the program is to examine how glass moves into and out of grain boundaries and why this movement takes. By understanding this process we will be better able to control this important aspect of many ceramic materials. Since TEM is the main tool used in this investigation, we will continue to develop methods for analyzing interfaces as part of this program.},
doi = {10.2172/5738322},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5738322}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1992},
month = {2}
}