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Title: Radium-226 body burden in U miners by measurement of Rn in exhaled breath

Abstract

Uranium miners were made to inhale Rn-free medical O2 and exhale through a 5.2-1 A1 chamber before reporting to work. The chamber was sealed and isolated from the sampling circuit. An electrostatic plate collected the freshly formed Rn-decay products. The subsequent programmed alpha counting of the plate yielded a Rn concentration in the exhaled breath. Assuming that the exhaled breath represents a certain fraction of the Rn produced inside the body, the body burden of 226Ra was calculated. Standardisation of this procedure and the data collected on 310 miners are discussed. The procedure is simple and applicable for routine measurements. The miner needs to be in the laboratory for only 10 min. The system is also portable for field application. For routine use, the minimum detectable concentration is 3.87 Bq X m-3 which corresponds to a body burden of 0.26 kBq in a typical miner, if one assumes the Rn release fraction from the body as 84%. The system offers a more convenient and sensitive alternative to whole-body counting of workers for 226Ra.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, India
OSTI Identifier:
5737584
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Health Phys.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; MINERS; PERSONNEL MONITORING; RADIUM 226; BODY BURDEN; ALPHA DETECTION; BREATH; EXHALATION; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADON; URANIUM MINES; ALKALINE EARTH ISOTOPES; ALPHA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CHARGED PARTICLE DETECTION; CLEARANCE; DETECTION; ELEMENTS; EVEN-EVEN NUCLEI; EXCRETION; FLUIDS; GASES; HEAVY NUCLEI; ISOTOPES; MINES; MONITORING; NONMETALS; NUCLEI; PERSONNEL; RADIATION DETECTION; RADIATION MONITORING; RADIOISOTOPES; RADIUM ISOTOPES; RARE GASES; SAFETY; UNDERGROUND FACILITIES; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 560161* - Radionuclide Effects, Kinetics, & Toxicology- Man; 054000 - Nuclear Fuels- Health & Safety

Citation Formats

Srivastava, G K, Raghavayya, M, Kotrappa, P, and Somasundaram, S. Radium-226 body burden in U miners by measurement of Rn in exhaled breath. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.1097/00004032-198602000-00005.
Srivastava, G K, Raghavayya, M, Kotrappa, P, & Somasundaram, S. Radium-226 body burden in U miners by measurement of Rn in exhaled breath. United States. doi:10.1097/00004032-198602000-00005.
Srivastava, G K, Raghavayya, M, Kotrappa, P, and Somasundaram, S. Sat . "Radium-226 body burden in U miners by measurement of Rn in exhaled breath". United States. doi:10.1097/00004032-198602000-00005.
@article{osti_5737584,
title = {Radium-226 body burden in U miners by measurement of Rn in exhaled breath},
author = {Srivastava, G K and Raghavayya, M and Kotrappa, P and Somasundaram, S},
abstractNote = {Uranium miners were made to inhale Rn-free medical O2 and exhale through a 5.2-1 A1 chamber before reporting to work. The chamber was sealed and isolated from the sampling circuit. An electrostatic plate collected the freshly formed Rn-decay products. The subsequent programmed alpha counting of the plate yielded a Rn concentration in the exhaled breath. Assuming that the exhaled breath represents a certain fraction of the Rn produced inside the body, the body burden of 226Ra was calculated. Standardisation of this procedure and the data collected on 310 miners are discussed. The procedure is simple and applicable for routine measurements. The miner needs to be in the laboratory for only 10 min. The system is also portable for field application. For routine use, the minimum detectable concentration is 3.87 Bq X m-3 which corresponds to a body burden of 0.26 kBq in a typical miner, if one assumes the Rn release fraction from the body as 84%. The system offers a more convenient and sensitive alternative to whole-body counting of workers for 226Ra.},
doi = {10.1097/00004032-198602000-00005},
journal = {Health Phys.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {1986},
month = {2}
}