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Title: Computation of solution equilibria: A guide to methods in potentiometry, extraction, and spectrophotometry

Abstract

Although this book contains a very good review of computation methods applicable to equilibrium systems, most of the book is dedicated to the description and evaluation of computer programs available for doing such calculations. As stated in the preface, the authors (two computniks and a user of graphical and computer methods) have joined forces in order to present the reader with the points of view of both the creator and user of modern computer program tools available for the study of solution equilibria. The successful presentation of such a complicated amalgamation of concepts is greatly aided by the structure of the book, which begins with a brief but thorough discussion of equilibrium concepts in general, followed by an equally brief discussion of experimental methods used to study equilibria with potentiometric, extraction, and spectroscopic methods. These sections would not be sufficient to teach these topics to the beginner but offer an informative presentation of concepts in relation to one another to those already familiar with basic equilibrium concepts. The importance of evaluating and analyzing the suitability of data for further analysis is then presented before an in depth (by a chemist's standards) look at the individual parts that make up amore » detailed equilibrium analysis program. The next one-third of the book is an examination of specific equilibrium problems and the programs available to study them. These are divided into chapters devoted to potentiometric, extraction, and spectroscopic methods. The format is to discuss a variety of programs, one at a time, including the parts of the program, the types of problems to which it has been applied, and the program's limitations. A number of problems are then presented, which are representative of the type of questions that are normally addressed by research projects in the area.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5735000
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: From review by Richard A. Butler, in Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 111, No. 5(1 Mar 1989)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; POTENTIOMETRY; CALCULATION METHODS; SOLVENT EXTRACTION; SPECTROPHOTOMETRY; COMPUTERS; EQUILIBRIUM; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; SOLUTIONS; DISPERSIONS; EXTRACTION; MIXTURES; SEPARATION PROCESSES; TITRATION; 400201* - Chemical & Physicochemical Properties; 400105 - Separation Procedures; 400102 - Chemical & Spectral Procedures

Citation Formats

Meloun, M, Havel, J, and Hogfeldt, E. Computation of solution equilibria: A guide to methods in potentiometry, extraction, and spectrophotometry. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Meloun, M, Havel, J, & Hogfeldt, E. Computation of solution equilibria: A guide to methods in potentiometry, extraction, and spectrophotometry. United States.
Meloun, M, Havel, J, and Hogfeldt, E. Fri . "Computation of solution equilibria: A guide to methods in potentiometry, extraction, and spectrophotometry". United States.
@article{osti_5735000,
title = {Computation of solution equilibria: A guide to methods in potentiometry, extraction, and spectrophotometry},
author = {Meloun, M and Havel, J and Hogfeldt, E},
abstractNote = {Although this book contains a very good review of computation methods applicable to equilibrium systems, most of the book is dedicated to the description and evaluation of computer programs available for doing such calculations. As stated in the preface, the authors (two computniks and a user of graphical and computer methods) have joined forces in order to present the reader with the points of view of both the creator and user of modern computer program tools available for the study of solution equilibria. The successful presentation of such a complicated amalgamation of concepts is greatly aided by the structure of the book, which begins with a brief but thorough discussion of equilibrium concepts in general, followed by an equally brief discussion of experimental methods used to study equilibria with potentiometric, extraction, and spectroscopic methods. These sections would not be sufficient to teach these topics to the beginner but offer an informative presentation of concepts in relation to one another to those already familiar with basic equilibrium concepts. The importance of evaluating and analyzing the suitability of data for further analysis is then presented before an in depth (by a chemist's standards) look at the individual parts that make up a detailed equilibrium analysis program. The next one-third of the book is an examination of specific equilibrium problems and the programs available to study them. These are divided into chapters devoted to potentiometric, extraction, and spectroscopic methods. The format is to discuss a variety of programs, one at a time, including the parts of the program, the types of problems to which it has been applied, and the program's limitations. A number of problems are then presented, which are representative of the type of questions that are normally addressed by research projects in the area.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5735000}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1988},
month = {1}
}

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