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Title: Logistical teamwork tames Madagascar wildcats

Abstract

Amoco Production Company's exploration program in western Madagascar's Sakalaya coastal plain exemplifies the unique logistical challenges both operator and drilling contractor must undergo to reach the few remaining onshore frontier areas. Sakalava is characterized by deep rivers, flood prone tributaries, and a lone 40 km hard-surface road. Problems caused by a lack of port facilities and oil field services are complicated by thousands of square miles of unimproved wooded plains. Rainwater from the nearby mountains of central Madagascar frequently floods rivers in the Sakalava coastal plain leaving impassable marshes in their wake. Prior to this project, about 45 wells had been drilled in Madagascar. Most recently, state oil company Omnis contracted Bawden Drilling International Inc. to drill nine wells for its heavy oil project on the Tsimioro oil prospect. Bawden provided both logistical and drilling services for that program.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Bawden Drilling International Inc., Houston, TX
OSTI Identifier:
5720563
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Pet. Eng. Int.; (United States); Journal Volume: 58:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; MADAGASCAR; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; EXPLORATION; CONTRACTORS; FLOODS; PETROLEUM INDUSTRY; RAIN; RIVERS; WELL DRILLING; AFRICA; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; DISASTERS; DRILLING; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; INDUSTRY; ISLANDS; MINERAL RESOURCES; RESOURCES; STREAMS; SURFACE WATERS 020200* -- Petroleum-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Twa, W. Logistical teamwork tames Madagascar wildcats. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Twa, W. Logistical teamwork tames Madagascar wildcats. United States.
Twa, W. 1986. "Logistical teamwork tames Madagascar wildcats". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5720563,
title = {Logistical teamwork tames Madagascar wildcats},
author = {Twa, W.},
abstractNote = {Amoco Production Company's exploration program in western Madagascar's Sakalaya coastal plain exemplifies the unique logistical challenges both operator and drilling contractor must undergo to reach the few remaining onshore frontier areas. Sakalava is characterized by deep rivers, flood prone tributaries, and a lone 40 km hard-surface road. Problems caused by a lack of port facilities and oil field services are complicated by thousands of square miles of unimproved wooded plains. Rainwater from the nearby mountains of central Madagascar frequently floods rivers in the Sakalava coastal plain leaving impassable marshes in their wake. Prior to this project, about 45 wells had been drilled in Madagascar. Most recently, state oil company Omnis contracted Bawden Drilling International Inc. to drill nine wells for its heavy oil project on the Tsimioro oil prospect. Bawden provided both logistical and drilling services for that program.},
doi = {},
journal = {Pet. Eng. Int.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 58:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 3
}
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