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Title: Canada places export tax on softwood lumber

Abstract

On a large chunk of land just outside Corner Brook, Newfoundland, stands what must be one of Canada's biggest bargains. There publicly owned trees are being sold to a pulp company at 25 cents per cord. Depending on the local climate, in the neighborhood of six to eight cords of wood are needed to heat a house during a Canadian winter. If a Canadian heated with wood and had a deal like the pulp company has with the government, it would cost less than $2 to heat that home for the year. As of January 8, 1987, Canadians have a new incentive to increase stumpage rates, and some Canadians are saying it is a change for the better. In an agreement finally reached on December 31, 1986, all Canadian softwood lumber entering the US carries a 15% export charge to make up for what American producers claimed to be subsidized stumpage. Although the Canadian government collects the charge, it did not begin to do so willingly.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Canadian Broadcasting Corp., Regina, Saskatchewan
OSTI Identifier:
5716122
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
J. For.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 85:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CANADA; EXPORTS; FORESTS; IMPORTS; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; WOOD; COST; PAPER INDUSTRY; PUBLIC LANDS; TRADE; USA; INDUSTRY; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; NORTH AMERICA; WOOD PRODUCTS INDUSTRY; 290200* - Energy Planning & Policy- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Pittis, D E.B. Canada places export tax on softwood lumber. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Pittis, D E.B. Canada places export tax on softwood lumber. United States.
Pittis, D E.B. Fri . "Canada places export tax on softwood lumber". United States.
@article{osti_5716122,
title = {Canada places export tax on softwood lumber},
author = {Pittis, D E.B.},
abstractNote = {On a large chunk of land just outside Corner Brook, Newfoundland, stands what must be one of Canada's biggest bargains. There publicly owned trees are being sold to a pulp company at 25 cents per cord. Depending on the local climate, in the neighborhood of six to eight cords of wood are needed to heat a house during a Canadian winter. If a Canadian heated with wood and had a deal like the pulp company has with the government, it would cost less than $2 to heat that home for the year. As of January 8, 1987, Canadians have a new incentive to increase stumpage rates, and some Canadians are saying it is a change for the better. In an agreement finally reached on December 31, 1986, all Canadian softwood lumber entering the US carries a 15% export charge to make up for what American producers claimed to be subsidized stumpage. Although the Canadian government collects the charge, it did not begin to do so willingly.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. For.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 85:5,
place = {United States},
year = {1987},
month = {5}
}