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Title: Geology of central Lake Michigan

Abstract

The geology beneath Lake Michigan between 43/sup 0/00' and 44/sup 0/00'N and between 86/sup 0/30' and 87/sup 0/40' W is interpreted from a synthesis of 1,700 km of continuous seismic reflection profile data, bathymetry, grab samples, and onshore surface and subsurface information. The continuous seismic reflection profiles and bathymetry provided information for maps of unconsolidated sediment thickness and Paleozoic bedrock topography. Two structural-stratigraphic cross sections of the study area were constructed by utilizing a composite subsurface-surface section for eastern Wisconsin and two control wells in western Michigan. The cross sections, grab samples previously described in the literature, the bedrock topographic map, and published maps were used to construct a Paleozoic geologic map for central Lake Michigan. Rocks from Middle Silurian through Early Mississippian age form subcrops beneath the study area, whereas rocks of Early Silurian, Ordovician, and Late Cambrian age are present at greater depth. The Upper Cambrian rocks unconformably overlie Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks. The structural-stratigraphic cross sections also allow speculation about the petroleum potential beneath Lake Michigan. The possibility of oil occurrences within the Silurian is enhanced by major east-west facies changes, and other horizons with promise are present in Devonian and Ordovician rocks. Although Michigan andmore » Wisconsin laws currently prohibit petroleum exploration in Lake Michigan, it is an area with future potential.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ;
  1. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5708404
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol., Bull.; (United States); Journal Volume: 65:9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; LAKE MICHIGAN; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; PETROLEUM GEOLOGY; EXPLORATION; CAMBRIAN PERIOD; IGNEOUS ROCKS; METAMORPHIC ROCKS; MICHIGAN; MISSISSIPPIAN PERIOD; PRECAMBRIAN ERA; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; SEISMIC SURVEYS; SILURIAN PERIOD; STRATIGRAPHY; WELLS; WISCONSIN; GEOLOGIC AGES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; GEOLOGY; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; GREAT LAKES; GREAT LAKES REGION; LAKES; MINERAL RESOURCES; NORTH AMERICA; PALEOZOIC ERA; RESOURCES; ROCKS; SURFACE WATERS; SURVEYS; USA 020200* -- Petroleum-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Wold, R.J., Paull, R.A., Wolosin, C.A., and Friedel, R.J. Geology of central Lake Michigan. United States: N. p., 1981. Web.
Wold, R.J., Paull, R.A., Wolosin, C.A., & Friedel, R.J. Geology of central Lake Michigan. United States.
Wold, R.J., Paull, R.A., Wolosin, C.A., and Friedel, R.J. 1981. "Geology of central Lake Michigan". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5708404,
title = {Geology of central Lake Michigan},
author = {Wold, R.J. and Paull, R.A. and Wolosin, C.A. and Friedel, R.J.},
abstractNote = {The geology beneath Lake Michigan between 43/sup 0/00' and 44/sup 0/00'N and between 86/sup 0/30' and 87/sup 0/40' W is interpreted from a synthesis of 1,700 km of continuous seismic reflection profile data, bathymetry, grab samples, and onshore surface and subsurface information. The continuous seismic reflection profiles and bathymetry provided information for maps of unconsolidated sediment thickness and Paleozoic bedrock topography. Two structural-stratigraphic cross sections of the study area were constructed by utilizing a composite subsurface-surface section for eastern Wisconsin and two control wells in western Michigan. The cross sections, grab samples previously described in the literature, the bedrock topographic map, and published maps were used to construct a Paleozoic geologic map for central Lake Michigan. Rocks from Middle Silurian through Early Mississippian age form subcrops beneath the study area, whereas rocks of Early Silurian, Ordovician, and Late Cambrian age are present at greater depth. The Upper Cambrian rocks unconformably overlie Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks. The structural-stratigraphic cross sections also allow speculation about the petroleum potential beneath Lake Michigan. The possibility of oil occurrences within the Silurian is enhanced by major east-west facies changes, and other horizons with promise are present in Devonian and Ordovician rocks. Although Michigan and Wisconsin laws currently prohibit petroleum exploration in Lake Michigan, it is an area with future potential.},
doi = {},
journal = {Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol., Bull.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 65:9,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month = 9
}
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