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Title: Radiometric detection of yeasts in blood cultures of cancer patients

Abstract

During a 12-month period, 19,457 blood cultures were collected. Yeasts were isolated from 193 cultures derived from 76 cancer patients. Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis accounted for 79% of isolates. Of the three methods compared, the radiometric method required 2.9 days to become positive, blind subculture required 2.6 days, and Gram stains required 1 day. However, the radiometric method was clearly superior in detecting positive cultures, since 73% of all cultures were first detected radiometrically, 22% were detected by subculture, and only 5% were detected by Gram stain. Although 93% of the isolates were detected by aerobic culture, five (7%) isolates were obtained only from anaerobic cultures. Seven days of incubation appear to be sufficient for the radiometric detection of yeasts.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5706066
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Clin. Microbiol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 12:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CANDIDA; DIAGNOSIS; NEOPLASMS; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; DIAGNOSTIC USES; BLOOD; PATIENTS; RADIOMETRIC ANALYSIS; TISSUE CULTURES; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BODY FLUIDS; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; DISEASES; DRUGS; FUNGI; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; MATERIALS; MICROORGANISMS; PLANTS; QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; USES; YEASTS; 550601* - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics; 550701 - Microbiology- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Hopfer, R.L., Orengo, A., Chesnut, S., and Wenglar, M. Radiometric detection of yeasts in blood cultures of cancer patients. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Hopfer, R.L., Orengo, A., Chesnut, S., & Wenglar, M. Radiometric detection of yeasts in blood cultures of cancer patients. United States.
Hopfer, R.L., Orengo, A., Chesnut, S., and Wenglar, M. 1980. "Radiometric detection of yeasts in blood cultures of cancer patients". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5706066,
title = {Radiometric detection of yeasts in blood cultures of cancer patients},
author = {Hopfer, R.L. and Orengo, A. and Chesnut, S. and Wenglar, M.},
abstractNote = {During a 12-month period, 19,457 blood cultures were collected. Yeasts were isolated from 193 cultures derived from 76 cancer patients. Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis accounted for 79% of isolates. Of the three methods compared, the radiometric method required 2.9 days to become positive, blind subculture required 2.6 days, and Gram stains required 1 day. However, the radiometric method was clearly superior in detecting positive cultures, since 73% of all cultures were first detected radiometrically, 22% were detected by subculture, and only 5% were detected by Gram stain. Although 93% of the isolates were detected by aerobic culture, five (7%) isolates were obtained only from anaerobic cultures. Seven days of incubation appear to be sufficient for the radiometric detection of yeasts.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Clin. Microbiol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 12:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1980,
month = 9
}
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