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Title: WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report

Abstract

This study was undertaken to determine the technical feasibility of upgrading the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to meet the offgas emission limits proposed in the Maximum Achievable Control Technologies (MACT)rule. Four practicable offgas treatment processes were identified, which, if installed, would enable the WERF to meet the anticipated MACT emission limits for dioxins and furans (D/F), hydrochloric acid (HCI), and mercury (Hg). Due to the three-year time restraint for MACT compliance, any technology chosen for the upgrade must be performed within the general plant project funding limit of $5 M. The option selected consists of a partial-quench evaporative cooler with dry sorbent injection for HCI removal followed by a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed for Hg control. The planning cost estimate for implementing the option is $4.17 M (with 24% contingency). The total estimated cost includes capital costs, design and construction costs, and project management costs. Capital costs include the purchase of a new offgas evaporative cooler, a dry sorbent injection system with reagent storage, a new fabric filter baghouse, a fixed carbon bed absorber, and two offgas induced draft exhaust fans. It is estimated that 21 months will be required tomore » complete the recommended modification to the WERF. The partial-quench cooler is designed to rapidly cool the offgas exiting the secondary combustion chamber to minimize D/F formation. Dry sorbent injection of an alkali reagent into the offgas is recommended. The alkali reacts with the HCI to form a salt, which is captured with the fly ash in the baghouse. A design HCI removal efficiency of 97.2% allows for the feeding 20 lbs/hr of chlorine to the WERF incinerator. The sorbent feed rate can be adjusted to achieve the desired HCI removal efficiency. A fixed bed of sulfur-impregnated carbon was conservatively sized for a total Hg removal capacity when feeding 10 g/hr Hg to the WERF incinerator. An added benefit for using carbon adsorption is that the activated carbon will also capture a large fraction of any residual D/F present in the offgas.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
5702
Report Number(s):
INEEL/EXT-98-01166
ON: DE00005702
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-94ID13223
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; Dioxin; Furans; Hydrochloric Acid; Mercury; Feasibility Studies; Gaseous Wastes; Waste Processing; Off-Gas Systems

Citation Formats

B. Bonnema, D. Moser, J. Riedesel, K. Kooda, K. Liekhus, K. Rebish, and S. Poling. WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/5702.
B. Bonnema, D. Moser, J. Riedesel, K. Kooda, K. Liekhus, K. Rebish, & S. Poling. WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report. United States. doi:10.2172/5702.
B. Bonnema, D. Moser, J. Riedesel, K. Kooda, K. Liekhus, K. Rebish, and S. Poling. Sun . "WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report". United States. doi:10.2172/5702. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5702.
@article{osti_5702,
title = {WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report},
author = {B. Bonnema and D. Moser and J. Riedesel and K. Kooda and K. Liekhus and K. Rebish and S. Poling},
abstractNote = {This study was undertaken to determine the technical feasibility of upgrading the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to meet the offgas emission limits proposed in the Maximum Achievable Control Technologies (MACT)rule. Four practicable offgas treatment processes were identified, which, if installed, would enable the WERF to meet the anticipated MACT emission limits for dioxins and furans (D/F), hydrochloric acid (HCI), and mercury (Hg). Due to the three-year time restraint for MACT compliance, any technology chosen for the upgrade must be performed within the general plant project funding limit of $5 M. The option selected consists of a partial-quench evaporative cooler with dry sorbent injection for HCI removal followed by a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed for Hg control. The planning cost estimate for implementing the option is $4.17 M (with 24% contingency). The total estimated cost includes capital costs, design and construction costs, and project management costs. Capital costs include the purchase of a new offgas evaporative cooler, a dry sorbent injection system with reagent storage, a new fabric filter baghouse, a fixed carbon bed absorber, and two offgas induced draft exhaust fans. It is estimated that 21 months will be required to complete the recommended modification to the WERF. The partial-quench cooler is designed to rapidly cool the offgas exiting the secondary combustion chamber to minimize D/F formation. Dry sorbent injection of an alkali reagent into the offgas is recommended. The alkali reacts with the HCI to form a salt, which is captured with the fly ash in the baghouse. A design HCI removal efficiency of 97.2% allows for the feeding 20 lbs/hr of chlorine to the WERF incinerator. The sorbent feed rate can be adjusted to achieve the desired HCI removal efficiency. A fixed bed of sulfur-impregnated carbon was conservatively sized for a total Hg removal capacity when feeding 10 g/hr Hg to the WERF incinerator. An added benefit for using carbon adsorption is that the activated carbon will also capture a large fraction of any residual D/F present in the offgas.},
doi = {10.2172/5702},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {11}
}