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Title: Justifications of policy-error correction: a case study of error correction in the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident

Abstract

The sensational Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident of 1979 raised many policy problems. Since the TMI accident, many authorities in the nation, including the President's Commission on TMI, Congress, GAO, as well as NRC, have researched lessons and recommended various corrective measures for the improvement of nuclear regulatory policy. As an effort to translate the recommendations into effective actions, the NRC developed the TMI Action Plan. How sound are these corrective actions. The NRC approach to the TMI Action Plan is justifiable to the extent that decisions were reached by procedures to reduce the effects of judgmental bias. Major findings from the NRC's effort to justify the corrective actions include: (A) The deficiencies and errors in the operations at the Three Mile Island Plant were not defined through a process of comprehensive analysis. (B) Instead, problems were identified pragmatically and segmentally, through empirical investigations. These problems tended to take one of two forms - determinate problems subject to regulatory correction on the basis of available causal knowledge, and indeterminate problems solved by interim rules plus continuing study. The information to justify the solution was adjusted to the problem characteristics. (C) Finally, uncertainty in the determinate problems was resolvedmore » by seeking more causal information, while efforts to resolve indeterminate problems relied upon collective judgment and a consensus rule governing decisions about interim resolutions.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5700778
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (Ph. D.)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; REGULATIONS; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; ERRORS; HUMAN FACTORS; THREE MILE ISLAND-2 REACTOR; US NRC; PLANNING; ACCIDENTS; ENRICHED URANIUM REACTORS; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; POWER PLANTS; POWER REACTORS; PWR TYPE REACTORS; REACTORS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; THERMAL REACTORS; US ORGANIZATIONS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; WATER MODERATED REACTORS; 220900* - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Reactor Safety; 290600 - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy

Citation Formats

Kim, Y P. Justifications of policy-error correction: a case study of error correction in the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Kim, Y P. Justifications of policy-error correction: a case study of error correction in the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident. United States.
Kim, Y P. Fri . "Justifications of policy-error correction: a case study of error correction in the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident". United States.
@article{osti_5700778,
title = {Justifications of policy-error correction: a case study of error correction in the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident},
author = {Kim, Y P},
abstractNote = {The sensational Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant Accident of 1979 raised many policy problems. Since the TMI accident, many authorities in the nation, including the President's Commission on TMI, Congress, GAO, as well as NRC, have researched lessons and recommended various corrective measures for the improvement of nuclear regulatory policy. As an effort to translate the recommendations into effective actions, the NRC developed the TMI Action Plan. How sound are these corrective actions. The NRC approach to the TMI Action Plan is justifiable to the extent that decisions were reached by procedures to reduce the effects of judgmental bias. Major findings from the NRC's effort to justify the corrective actions include: (A) The deficiencies and errors in the operations at the Three Mile Island Plant were not defined through a process of comprehensive analysis. (B) Instead, problems were identified pragmatically and segmentally, through empirical investigations. These problems tended to take one of two forms - determinate problems subject to regulatory correction on the basis of available causal knowledge, and indeterminate problems solved by interim rules plus continuing study. The information to justify the solution was adjusted to the problem characteristics. (C) Finally, uncertainty in the determinate problems was resolved by seeking more causal information, while efforts to resolve indeterminate problems relied upon collective judgment and a consensus rule governing decisions about interim resolutions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1982},
month = {1}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
Other availability
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