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Title: Sedimentary petrology and tectonic significance of Tertiary sediments in southern White River Valley, Nevada

Abstract

Up to 20 m of undated Tertiary sediment have been exposed by incision of the White River in southern White River Valley, Nevada. The sediments, deposited in two distinct environments and time periods, range from conglomerate to mudstone. Older sediments comprise alluvial-fan and lacustrine facies deposited in a closed basin. Alluvial-fan grain size and provenance patterns indicate centripetal transport into a topographic low located on the western margin of the valley. Very fine grained sandstone to mudstone basin-center deposits contain pennate diatoms and perhaps other microfossils. The basin-fill deposits are unconformably overlain by stream-terrace conglomerate. Such terraces are found along the White River as far south as Lake Mead and relate to the present southward external drainage. Multiple terrace levels, formed during incision, reflect base-level changes in the Colorado River System. The valley is bounded by normal faults, on the east by the White River fault and west by the Pahroc fault, in apparent contrast to the half-graben form of nearby basins. The alluvial-fan deposits are cut by the Pahroc fault but appear to postdate slip on the White River fault. Facies patterns in the basin fill thus indicate concentration of fine-grained sediment near the fault that was active duringmore » deposition. Terrace conglomerates indicate progradation of coarse clastics across the fine basinal deposits after activity on the bounding fault ceased. These relationships support the recent hypothesis that coarse clastic sedimentation in a basin may reflect post-tectonic rather than syntectonic deposition.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City
OSTI Identifier:
5696924
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5696924
Report Number(s):
CONF-870915-
Journal ID: CODEN: AABUD
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
AAPG (Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol.) Bull.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 71:8; Conference: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Rocky Mountain Section meeting, Boise, ID, USA, 13 Sep 1987
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; NEVADA; ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; RESERVOIR ROCK; GEOLOGY; CONGLOMERATES; GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS; SEDIMENTARY BASINS; TECTONICS; TERTIARY PERIOD; CENOZOIC ERA; FEDERAL REGION IX; GEOLOGIC AGES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; MINERAL RESOURCES; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; ROCKS; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; USA 020200* -- Petroleum-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Diguiseppi, W.H. Sedimentary petrology and tectonic significance of Tertiary sediments in southern White River Valley, Nevada. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Diguiseppi, W.H. Sedimentary petrology and tectonic significance of Tertiary sediments in southern White River Valley, Nevada. United States.
Diguiseppi, W.H. Sat . "Sedimentary petrology and tectonic significance of Tertiary sediments in southern White River Valley, Nevada". United States.
@article{osti_5696924,
title = {Sedimentary petrology and tectonic significance of Tertiary sediments in southern White River Valley, Nevada},
author = {Diguiseppi, W.H.},
abstractNote = {Up to 20 m of undated Tertiary sediment have been exposed by incision of the White River in southern White River Valley, Nevada. The sediments, deposited in two distinct environments and time periods, range from conglomerate to mudstone. Older sediments comprise alluvial-fan and lacustrine facies deposited in a closed basin. Alluvial-fan grain size and provenance patterns indicate centripetal transport into a topographic low located on the western margin of the valley. Very fine grained sandstone to mudstone basin-center deposits contain pennate diatoms and perhaps other microfossils. The basin-fill deposits are unconformably overlain by stream-terrace conglomerate. Such terraces are found along the White River as far south as Lake Mead and relate to the present southward external drainage. Multiple terrace levels, formed during incision, reflect base-level changes in the Colorado River System. The valley is bounded by normal faults, on the east by the White River fault and west by the Pahroc fault, in apparent contrast to the half-graben form of nearby basins. The alluvial-fan deposits are cut by the Pahroc fault but appear to postdate slip on the White River fault. Facies patterns in the basin fill thus indicate concentration of fine-grained sediment near the fault that was active during deposition. Terrace conglomerates indicate progradation of coarse clastics across the fine basinal deposits after activity on the bounding fault ceased. These relationships support the recent hypothesis that coarse clastic sedimentation in a basin may reflect post-tectonic rather than syntectonic deposition.},
doi = {},
journal = {AAPG (Am. Assoc. Pet. Geol.) Bull.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 71:8,
place = {United States},
year = {1987},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
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