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Title: (Collection of high quality acoustical records for honeybees)

Abstract

High quality acoustical data records were collected for both European and Africanized honeybees under various field conditions. This data base was needed for more rigorous evaluation of a honeybee identification technique previously developed by the travelers from preliminary data sets. Laboratory-grade recording equipment was used to record sounds made by honeybees in and near their nests and during foraging flights. Recordings were obtained from European and Africanized honeybees in the same general environment. Preliminary analyses of the acoustical data base clearly support the general identification algorithm: Africanized honeybee noise has significantly higher frequency content than does European honeybee noise. As this algorithm is refined, it may result in the development of a simple field-portable device for identifying subspecies of honeybees. Further, the honeybee's acoustical signals appear to be correlated with specific colony conditions. Understanding these variations may have enormous benefit for entomologists and for the beekeeping industry.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/ER
OSTI Identifier:
5674453
Report Number(s):
ORNL/FTR-2496
ON: DE89017299
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BEES; CLASSIFICATION; TRAVEL; VENEZUELA; ANIMALS; ARTHROPODS; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; HYMENOPTERA; INSECTS; INVERTEBRATES; LATIN AMERICA; SOUTH AMERICA; 510100* - Environment, Terrestrial- Basic Studies- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Kerr, H.T., and Buchanan, M.E.. (Collection of high quality acoustical records for honeybees). United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Kerr, H.T., & Buchanan, M.E.. (Collection of high quality acoustical records for honeybees). United States.
Kerr, H.T., and Buchanan, M.E.. Thu . "(Collection of high quality acoustical records for honeybees)". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5674453,
title = {(Collection of high quality acoustical records for honeybees)},
author = {Kerr, H.T. and Buchanan, M.E.},
abstractNote = {High quality acoustical data records were collected for both European and Africanized honeybees under various field conditions. This data base was needed for more rigorous evaluation of a honeybee identification technique previously developed by the travelers from preliminary data sets. Laboratory-grade recording equipment was used to record sounds made by honeybees in and near their nests and during foraging flights. Recordings were obtained from European and Africanized honeybees in the same general environment. Preliminary analyses of the acoustical data base clearly support the general identification algorithm: Africanized honeybee noise has significantly higher frequency content than does European honeybee noise. As this algorithm is refined, it may result in the development of a simple field-portable device for identifying subspecies of honeybees. Further, the honeybee's acoustical signals appear to be correlated with specific colony conditions. Understanding these variations may have enormous benefit for entomologists and for the beekeeping industry.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 19 00:00:00 EST 1987},
month = {Thu Feb 19 00:00:00 EST 1987}
}

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