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Title: Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small bowel shielding

Abstract

The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18 MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine was more effective in prolonging survival than shielding of the proximal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thoughtmore » to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5669006
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiation Research; (USA); Journal Volume: 119:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; SMALL INTESTINE; RADIATION PROTECTION; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL SHIELDING; PHOTONS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION INJURIES; RATS; SURVIVAL CURVES; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BODY; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DOSES; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; EXTERNAL IRRADIATION; GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT; INJURIES; INTESTINES; IRRADIATION; MAMMALS; MASSLESS PARTICLES; ORGANS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RODENTS; SHIELDING; VERTEBRATES; 560152* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Animals

Citation Formats

Vigneulle, R.M., Vriesendorp, H.M., Taylor, P., Burns, W., and Pelkey, T.. Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small bowel shielding. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.2307/3577622.
Vigneulle, R.M., Vriesendorp, H.M., Taylor, P., Burns, W., & Pelkey, T.. Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small bowel shielding. United States. doi:10.2307/3577622.
Vigneulle, R.M., Vriesendorp, H.M., Taylor, P., Burns, W., and Pelkey, T.. 1989. "Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small bowel shielding". United States. doi:10.2307/3577622.
@article{osti_5669006,
title = {Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small bowel shielding},
author = {Vigneulle, R.M. and Vriesendorp, H.M. and Taylor, P. and Burns, W. and Pelkey, T.},
abstractNote = {The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18 MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 to 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine was more effective in prolonging survival than shielding of the proximal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.},
doi = {10.2307/3577622},
journal = {Radiation Research; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 119:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 8
}
  • The small intestine of the rat was shielded during total-body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of radiation dose and length of intestine shielded on survival. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized in groups of 10. Using aseptic surgical procedures 80, 40, 20, or 10 cm, or none of the proximal or distal small intestine were temporarily exteriorized and shielded during irradiation with photons from an 18-MeV linear accelerator. Less than 17% of the dose was delivered to the shielded intestines. In unshielded animals deaths occurred from Days 4 to 6 with 13, 15, or 17 Gy and from Days 8 tomore » 30 with 9, 11, and 12 Gy. However, in all animals exposed to 15 Gy with all or part of the small intestine shielded, survival was increased to between 5 and 9 days. Shielding of the distal small intestine. The previously identified target of radiation damage in the small intestine is the crypt stem cell. In this study, the analysis of histological specimens of shielded and irradiated small intestine suggested that humoral factors also influence intestinal histology and survival after irradiation. These humoral factors are thought to originate from the irradiated body tissues, the shielded proximal intestine, and the shielded distal intestine. Further studies are required to identify these factors and to determine their mode of action and their therapeutic potential after radiation damage to the small intestine.« less
  • After receiving 1000 r, hypoxic, total- or partialbody irradiation, 242 female Wistar rats were observed throughout their life span. Hypoxic irradiation with superimposed anesthesia resulted in 67 percent, 30day mortality. Selection of the colony by acute postirradiation deaths did not influence the magnitude of late radiation sequelae as measured by life-shortening. Growth retardation during the 2d post-irradiation year was well correlated with life-shortening. Life-shortening was observed after partial-body irradiation, to an extent approximately proportional to the weight of irradiated tissue. Nephrosclerosis was not observed unless the upper abdomen was included within the radiation field. Other than nephrosclerosis, a similar incidencemore » of disease was observed, at deaths in control and partial- or total-body irradiated rats. (auth)« less
  • Rats receiving lethal irradiation to their exteriorized small intestine with pulsed 18 MVp bremsstrahlung radiation live about 4 days longer than rats receiving a dose of total-body irradiation (TBI) causing intestinal death. The LD50 for intestinal irradiation is approximately 6 Gy higher than the LD50 for intestinal death after TBI. Survival time after exteriorized intestinal irradiation can be decreased, by adding abdominal irradiation. Adding thoracic or pelvic irradiation does not alter survival time. Shielding of large intestine improves survival after irradiation of the rest of the abdomen while the small intestine is also shielded. The kinetics of histological changes inmore » small intestinal tissues implicate the release of humoral factors after irradiation of the abdomen. Radiation injury develops faster in the first (proximal) 40 cm of the small intestine and is expressed predominantly as shortening in villus height. In the last (distal) 40 cm of the small intestine, the most pronounced radiation effect is a decrease in the number of crypts per millimeter. Irradiation (20 Gy) of the proximal small intestine causes 92 % mortality (median survival 10 days). Irradiation (20 Gy) of the distal small intestine causes 27% mortality (median survival > 30 days). In addition to depletion of crypt stem cells in the small intestine, other issues (humoral factors, irradiated subsection of the small intestine and shielding of the large intestine) appear to influence radiation-induced intestinal mortality.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate survival and neurocognitive outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with central nervous system (CNS) involvement treated according to an institutional protocol with stem cell transplantation (SCT) and a component of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in addition to total-body irradiation (TBI) as preparative regimen. Methods and Materials: Forty-one pediatric ALL patients underwent SCT with TBI and received additional cranial irradiation or CSI because of CNS leukemic involvement. Prospective neurocognitive testing was performed before and after SCT in a subset of patients. Cox regression models were used to determine associations of patient and disease characteristics and treatment methodsmore » with outcomes. Results: All patients received a cranial radiation boost; median total cranial dose was 24 Gy. Eighteen patients (44%) received a spinal boost; median total spinal dose for these patients was 18 Gy. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) for all patients was 67%. Those receiving CSI had a trend toward superior DFS compared with those receiving a cranial boost alone (hazard ratio 3.23, P=.14). Patients with isolated CNS disease before SCT had a trend toward superior DFS (hazard ratio 3.64, P=.11, 5-year DFS 74%) compared with those with combined CNS and bone marrow disease (5-year DFS 59%). Neurocognitive testing revealed a mean post-SCT overall intelligence quotient of 103.7 at 4.4 years. Relative deficiencies in processing speed and/or working memory were noted in 6 of 16 tested patients (38%). Pre- and post-SCT neurocognitive testing revealed no significant change in intelligence quotient (mean increase +4.7 points). At a mean of 12.5 years after transplant, 11 of 13 long-term survivors (85%) had completed at least some coursework at a 2- or 4-year college. Conclusion: The addition of CSI to TBI before SCT in pediatric ALL with CNS involvement is effective and well-tolerated. Craniospinal irradiation plus TBI is worthy of further protocol investigation in children with CNS leukemia.« less