skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Evolution of defect cluster distributions during irradiation

Abstract

Defects produced by irradiation are often strongly spatially correlated. Energetic primary recoil atoms produce cascades with vacant lattice sites predominantly in the central regions, and interstitial atoms at the periphery. A fraction of the defects produced form clusters during cascade events. Because of their spatial distribution more mobile interstitial atoms than vacancies are released into the matrix following the cascade events. Populations of vacancy and interstitial clusters evolve towards quasi-steady-state distributions. As long as vacancy clusters are thermally moderately stable, i.e., at temperatures below rapid self diffusion, an excess interstitial flux persists in the matrix; as a consequence, vacancy clusters formed in cascades shrink, and interstitial clusters grow. We examine the evolution of these cluster distributions, and their effects on sink strength and radiation-enhanced diffusion, as function of dose for irradiations at moderate temperatures. At temperatures at which thermal evaporation from vacancy clusters, can be neglected, the evolution of the cluster densities is characteristic of the primary recoil spectrum, but is independent of temperature or dose rate. The sink strength, radiation-enhanced diffusion, as well as other consequences of the evolving distributions such as the imbalance of the interstitial and vacancy fluxes in the matrix, approach slowly-changing quasi-steady-state values in amore » fraction of one displacement per atom, although certain details of the cluster distributions, e.g., the development of large interstitial loops, require several dpa's to approach steady state values. 22 refs., 6 figs.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5663824
Report Number(s):
ANL/CP-72655; CONF-9105130-3
ON: DE91013405
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International conference on physics of irradiation effects in metals, Siofok (Hungary), 20-24 May 1991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; METALS; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; ANNEALING; DIFFUSION; IRRADIATION; POINT DEFECTS; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; DISTRIBUTION; ELEMENTS; HEAT TREATMENTS; RADIATION EFFECTS; 360106* - Metals & Alloys- Radiation Effects; 360102 - Metals & Alloys- Structure & Phase Studies

Citation Formats

Wiedersich, H. Evolution of defect cluster distributions during irradiation. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Wiedersich, H. Evolution of defect cluster distributions during irradiation. United States.
Wiedersich, H. Wed . "Evolution of defect cluster distributions during irradiation". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5663824.
@article{osti_5663824,
title = {Evolution of defect cluster distributions during irradiation},
author = {Wiedersich, H},
abstractNote = {Defects produced by irradiation are often strongly spatially correlated. Energetic primary recoil atoms produce cascades with vacant lattice sites predominantly in the central regions, and interstitial atoms at the periphery. A fraction of the defects produced form clusters during cascade events. Because of their spatial distribution more mobile interstitial atoms than vacancies are released into the matrix following the cascade events. Populations of vacancy and interstitial clusters evolve towards quasi-steady-state distributions. As long as vacancy clusters are thermally moderately stable, i.e., at temperatures below rapid self diffusion, an excess interstitial flux persists in the matrix; as a consequence, vacancy clusters formed in cascades shrink, and interstitial clusters grow. We examine the evolution of these cluster distributions, and their effects on sink strength and radiation-enhanced diffusion, as function of dose for irradiations at moderate temperatures. At temperatures at which thermal evaporation from vacancy clusters, can be neglected, the evolution of the cluster densities is characteristic of the primary recoil spectrum, but is independent of temperature or dose rate. The sink strength, radiation-enhanced diffusion, as well as other consequences of the evolving distributions such as the imbalance of the interstitial and vacancy fluxes in the matrix, approach slowly-changing quasi-steady-state values in a fraction of one displacement per atom, although certain details of the cluster distributions, e.g., the development of large interstitial loops, require several dpa's to approach steady state values. 22 refs., 6 figs.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5663824}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1991},
month = {5}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: