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Title: Radioactive waste disposal in simulated peat bog repositories

Abstract

The Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 have required state governments to be responsible for providing low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities in their respective areas. Questions are (a) is the technology sufficiently advanced to ensure that radioactive wastes can be stored for 300 to 1000 yr without entering into any uncontrolled area. (b) since actual experience does not exist for nuclear waste disposal over this time period, can the mathematical models developed be tested and verified using unequivocal data. (c) how can the public perception of the problem be addressed and the potential risk assessment of the hazards be communicated. To address the technical problems of nuclear waste disposal in the acid precipitation regions of the Northern Hemisphere, a project was initiated in 1984 to evaluate an alternative method of nuclear waste disposal that may not rely completely on engineered barriers to protect the public. Certain natural biogeochemical systems have been retaining deposited materials since the last Ice Age (12,000 to 15,000 yr). It is the authors belief that the biogeochemical system of wetlands and peat bogs may provide an example of an analogue for a nuclearmore » waste repository system that can be tested and verified over a sufficient time period, at least for the LLW disposal problem.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA
OSTI Identifier:
5660285
Report Number(s):
CONF-870601-
Journal ID: CODEN: TANSA; TRN: 88-009714
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc.; (United States); Journal Volume: 54; Conference: Annual meeting of the American Nuclear Society, Dallas, TX, USA, 7 Jun 1987
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; SOILS; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; CESIUM 137; CHERNOBYLSK-4 REACTOR; PEAT; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; RISK ASSESSMENT; SOURCE TERMS; WASTE DISPOSAL ACTS; ACCIDENTS; ALKALI METAL ISOTOPES; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CESIUM ISOTOPES; ENERGY SOURCES; ENRICHED URANIUM REACTORS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTORS; ISOTOPES; LAWS; LWGR TYPE REACTORS; MANAGEMENT; MASS TRANSFER; MATERIALS; NUCLEI; ODD-EVEN NUCLEI; ORGANIC MATTER; POWER REACTORS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RADIOISOTOPES; REACTORS; THERMAL REACTORS; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; WATER COOLED REACTORS; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 052002* - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Disposal & Storage

Citation Formats

Schell, W.R., and Massey, C.D. Radioactive waste disposal in simulated peat bog repositories. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Schell, W.R., & Massey, C.D. Radioactive waste disposal in simulated peat bog repositories. United States.
Schell, W.R., and Massey, C.D. 1987. "Radioactive waste disposal in simulated peat bog repositories". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5660285,
title = {Radioactive waste disposal in simulated peat bog repositories},
author = {Schell, W.R. and Massey, C.D.},
abstractNote = {The Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 have required state governments to be responsible for providing low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities in their respective areas. Questions are (a) is the technology sufficiently advanced to ensure that radioactive wastes can be stored for 300 to 1000 yr without entering into any uncontrolled area. (b) since actual experience does not exist for nuclear waste disposal over this time period, can the mathematical models developed be tested and verified using unequivocal data. (c) how can the public perception of the problem be addressed and the potential risk assessment of the hazards be communicated. To address the technical problems of nuclear waste disposal in the acid precipitation regions of the Northern Hemisphere, a project was initiated in 1984 to evaluate an alternative method of nuclear waste disposal that may not rely completely on engineered barriers to protect the public. Certain natural biogeochemical systems have been retaining deposited materials since the last Ice Age (12,000 to 15,000 yr). It is the authors belief that the biogeochemical system of wetlands and peat bogs may provide an example of an analogue for a nuclear waste repository system that can be tested and verified over a sufficient time period, at least for the LLW disposal problem.},
doi = {},
journal = {Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 54,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • This paper will identify the three basic parts of regulating disposal of high-level radioactive waste: (1) establishing a standard of acceptable risk; (2) developing a disposal capability in the form of a geologic repository; (3) licensing of a geologic repository. It will identify the principals at the Federal Level responsible for accomplishing each part; namely, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), respectively. It will discuss, under an assumption of the existence of a standard of acceptable risk, the roles of NRC and DOE in terms of licensing--arriving at a judgmentmore » concerning protection of the public health and safety if waste is disposed in a geologic repository--and of licensability--that quality of a repository developed by DOE which will contribute to NRC's ability to arrive at a regulatory decision. The necessity that the fact of licensing be fully integrated into the repository development process is stressed.« less
  • There are four papers contained in this report which were presented at the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Gas Workshop to provide information about studies of waste-generated gas being conducted for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The paper by Davies et al. provides a general overview of the physical conditions pertinent to waste-generated gas and of the coupling of chemical, hydrologic, and structural processes. The paper by Brush et al. describes specific gas-generation processes and the laboratory- and bin-scale experiments being carried out to characterize these processes. The paper by Mendenhall et al. describes coupled modeling of gas generation andmore » room closure, and provides an analysis of the potential for fracture generation and growth. the paper by Webb describes a series of sensitivity calculations carried out to assess the importance of hydrologic parameters, such as formation permeability and two-phase characteristic curves. Together, these papers provide an overview of the present (September 1991) status of waste-generated gas studies for the WIPP.« less
  • There are four papers contained in this report which were presented at the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Gas Workshop to provide information about studies of waste-generated gas being conducted for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The paper by Davies et al. provides a general overview of the physical conditions pertinent to waste-generated gas and of the coupling of chemical, hydrologic, and structural processes. The paper by Brush et al. describes specific gas-generation processes and the laboratory- and bin-scale experiments being carried out to characterize these processes. The paper by Mendenhall et al. describes coupled modeling of gas generation andmore » room closure, and provides an analysis of the potential for fracture generation and growth. the paper by Webb describes a series of sensitivity calculations carried out to assess the importance of hydrologic parameters, such as formation permeability and two-phase characteristic curves. Together, these papers provide an overview of the present (September 1991) status of waste-generated gas studies for the WIPP.« less
  • Russian Federation has the leading experience in applying borehole storage/disposal method for SRS. A new immobilization technology for sources being disposed of in underground repositories was mastered by 1986 and since then it is used in the country. This method uses all advantages of borehole type repositories supplementing them with metal encapsulation of sources. Sources being uniformly allocated in the volume of underground vessel are fixed in the metal block hence ensuring long-term safety. The dissipation of radiogenic heat from SRS is considerably improved, radiation fields are reduced, and direct contact of sources to an environment is completely eliminated. Themore » capacity of a typical borehole storage/disposal facility is increased almost 6 times applying metal immobilization. That has made new technology extremely favourable economically. The metal immobilization of SRS is considered as an option in Belarus and Ukraine as well as Bulgaria. Immobilization of sources in metal matrices can be a real solution for retrieval of SRS from inadequate repositories.« less