skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Clinical and metabolic abnormalities associated with occupational exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

Abstract

A cross-sectional study of 120 male workers was conducted to determine the prevalence of increased polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) absorption as well as the presence of potentially related clinical and metabolic abnormalities. Three exposure categories (''exposed'', ''nominally exposed'', ''nonexposed'') were defined. Complete work histories, clinical histories, physical examinations and laboratory tests, including plasma PCB determinations were obtained. In addition, fat PCB levels were determined in randomly selected subjects in each exposed group. Evidence of dermatotoxicity was observed and elevated PCB levels were noted more frequently in the exposed group (p < .00001), correlating well with age and duration of employment. These correlations were stronger for fat (p < .001) than for plasma (p < .01) PCB levels. In the exposed group, significant correlations were found between plasma PCB and serum triglyceride (p < .00001) and serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) levels (p < .01). These correlations remained significant after controlling for either age or length of employment. No significant correlations were found between PCB levels and levels of cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or levels studied on liver function tests other than SGOT. Further analyses relating frequency of reported direct contact with PCB levels suggested a dermal route of exposure. An analysismore » by union affiliation demonstrated that those in crafts involving greater direct exposure had correspondingly higher elevations of PCB levels.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ;
  1. (Washington Occupational Health Associates, Inc., Washington, D.C.)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5656910
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5656910
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Occup. Med.; (United States); Journal Volume: 24:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CHLORINATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; TOXICITY; ADIPOSE TISSUE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BLOOD PLASMA; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY; HEALTH HAZARDS; INJURIES; PATIENTS; PERSONNEL; SKIN; ANIMAL TISSUES; AROMATICS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BODY; BODY FLUIDS; CHROMATOGRAPHY; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; HALOGENATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; HAZARDS; MATERIALS; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; TISSUES 560306* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology-- Man-- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Chase, K.H., Wong, O., Thomas, D., Berney, B.W., and Simon, R.K.. Clinical and metabolic abnormalities associated with occupational exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Chase, K.H., Wong, O., Thomas, D., Berney, B.W., & Simon, R.K.. Clinical and metabolic abnormalities associated with occupational exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). United States.
Chase, K.H., Wong, O., Thomas, D., Berney, B.W., and Simon, R.K.. Mon . "Clinical and metabolic abnormalities associated with occupational exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)". United States.
@article{osti_5656910,
title = {Clinical and metabolic abnormalities associated with occupational exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)},
author = {Chase, K.H. and Wong, O. and Thomas, D. and Berney, B.W. and Simon, R.K.},
abstractNote = {A cross-sectional study of 120 male workers was conducted to determine the prevalence of increased polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) absorption as well as the presence of potentially related clinical and metabolic abnormalities. Three exposure categories (''exposed'', ''nominally exposed'', ''nonexposed'') were defined. Complete work histories, clinical histories, physical examinations and laboratory tests, including plasma PCB determinations were obtained. In addition, fat PCB levels were determined in randomly selected subjects in each exposed group. Evidence of dermatotoxicity was observed and elevated PCB levels were noted more frequently in the exposed group (p < .00001), correlating well with age and duration of employment. These correlations were stronger for fat (p < .001) than for plasma (p < .01) PCB levels. In the exposed group, significant correlations were found between plasma PCB and serum triglyceride (p < .00001) and serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) levels (p < .01). These correlations remained significant after controlling for either age or length of employment. No significant correlations were found between PCB levels and levels of cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or levels studied on liver function tests other than SGOT. Further analyses relating frequency of reported direct contact with PCB levels suggested a dermal route of exposure. An analysis by union affiliation demonstrated that those in crafts involving greater direct exposure had correspondingly higher elevations of PCB levels.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Occup. Med.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 24:2,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1982},
month = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1982}
}