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Title: Urinary and renal papillary solutes during cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen

Abstract

We investigated the mechanisms by which prostaglandin synthetase (cyclooxygenase) inhibitors cause antidiuresis and antinatriuresis in anesthetized dogs. Cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen caused an increased total solute (Na+, K+, and urea) concentration in the renal papilla. Xenon 133 washout studies revealed no change in medullary blood flow. Ibuprofen induced a 147% increase in papillary Na+ concentration, while increasing urea and K+ only 98% and 35%, respectively, suggesting that a Na+ reabsorption mechanism rather than decreased papillary blood flow was responsible for a majority of the increased papillary solute concentration. A decrease in the excretion of Na+, but not of K+ or urea, in treated dogs further implies increased Na+ reabsorption. Thus, it appears that cyclooxygenase inhibition increases papillary solute concentration primarily by increasing Na+ transport into the papilla.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Louisville, KY
OSTI Identifier:
5653802
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Lab. Clin. Med.; (United States); Journal Volume: 110:6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ANTIPYRETICS; BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS; ENZYME INHIBITORS; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; SODIUM COMPOUNDS; MEMBRANE TRANSPORT; BLOOD FLOW; DOGS; ELECTROLYTES; OXYGENASES; POTASSIUM COMPOUNDS; SODIUM; UREA; XENON 133; ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS; ALKALI METALS; AMIDES; ANIMALS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CARBONIC ACID DERIVATIVES; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DEPRESSANTS; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DRUGS; ELEMENTS; ENZYMES; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; FUNCTIONS; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; INTERNAL CONVERSION RADIOISOTOPES; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; KINETICS; MAMMALS; METALS; NUCLEI; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; OXIDOREDUCTASES; RADIOISOTOPES; REACTION KINETICS; VERTEBRATES; XENON ISOTOPES 550201* -- Biochemistry-- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Passmore, J.C., Hartupee, D.A., and Jackson, B.A.. Urinary and renal papillary solutes during cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Passmore, J.C., Hartupee, D.A., & Jackson, B.A.. Urinary and renal papillary solutes during cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen. United States.
Passmore, J.C., Hartupee, D.A., and Jackson, B.A.. 1987. "Urinary and renal papillary solutes during cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5653802,
title = {Urinary and renal papillary solutes during cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen},
author = {Passmore, J.C. and Hartupee, D.A. and Jackson, B.A.},
abstractNote = {We investigated the mechanisms by which prostaglandin synthetase (cyclooxygenase) inhibitors cause antidiuresis and antinatriuresis in anesthetized dogs. Cyclooxygenase inhibition with ibuprofen caused an increased total solute (Na+, K+, and urea) concentration in the renal papilla. Xenon 133 washout studies revealed no change in medullary blood flow. Ibuprofen induced a 147% increase in papillary Na+ concentration, while increasing urea and K+ only 98% and 35%, respectively, suggesting that a Na+ reabsorption mechanism rather than decreased papillary blood flow was responsible for a majority of the increased papillary solute concentration. A decrease in the excretion of Na+, but not of K+ or urea, in treated dogs further implies increased Na+ reabsorption. Thus, it appears that cyclooxygenase inhibition increases papillary solute concentration primarily by increasing Na+ transport into the papilla.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Lab. Clin. Med.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 110:6,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month =
}
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