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Title: Concerning superconducting inertial guidance gyroscopes inside superconducting magnetic shields

Abstract

Superconductors can in theory be used to detect rotation by Josephson interference or by detection of the London field, a magnetic induction that fills the interior of any rotating bulk superconductor. One might hope to use these properties of superconductors to build a practical inertial guidance gyroscope. A problem arises from the necessity of surrounding the device with superconducting magnetic shielding: the London field generated by a co-rotating shield eliminates the response of the superconducting device within the shield. The present article demonstrates this point more rigorously than has been done before, discussing solutions of Ampere`s law for rotating and nonrotating superconductors and paying careful attention to boundary conditions. Beginning with a supercurrent density derivable from either the Ginzburg-Landau or the London theory of superconductivity, the article shows: (1) that a superconducting device cannot distinguish between rotation and an applied magnetic field; (2) that a superconducting device surrounded by a co-rotating superconducting shield cannot detect rotation. The term `superconducting gyroscope` in this article refers only to a device whose working principle is the response of the superconductor itself to rotation, not to any device in which superconducting electronic components are used to detect some other effect. {copyright} {ital 1997 Americanmore » Institute of Physics.}« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
564878
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 82; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: PBD: Dec 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
66 PHYSICS; SUPERCONDUCTING DEVICES; GYROSCOPES; MAGNETIC SHIELDING; JOSEPHSON EFFECT; ROTATION; LONDON EQUATION; GINZBURG-LANDAU THEORY

Citation Formats

Satterthwaite, J.C., and Gawlinski, E.T. Concerning superconducting inertial guidance gyroscopes inside superconducting magnetic shields. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.1063/1.366451.
Satterthwaite, J.C., & Gawlinski, E.T. Concerning superconducting inertial guidance gyroscopes inside superconducting magnetic shields. United States. doi:10.1063/1.366451.
Satterthwaite, J.C., and Gawlinski, E.T. Mon . "Concerning superconducting inertial guidance gyroscopes inside superconducting magnetic shields". United States. doi:10.1063/1.366451.
@article{osti_564878,
title = {Concerning superconducting inertial guidance gyroscopes inside superconducting magnetic shields},
author = {Satterthwaite, J.C. and Gawlinski, E.T.},
abstractNote = {Superconductors can in theory be used to detect rotation by Josephson interference or by detection of the London field, a magnetic induction that fills the interior of any rotating bulk superconductor. One might hope to use these properties of superconductors to build a practical inertial guidance gyroscope. A problem arises from the necessity of surrounding the device with superconducting magnetic shielding: the London field generated by a co-rotating shield eliminates the response of the superconducting device within the shield. The present article demonstrates this point more rigorously than has been done before, discussing solutions of Ampere`s law for rotating and nonrotating superconductors and paying careful attention to boundary conditions. Beginning with a supercurrent density derivable from either the Ginzburg-Landau or the London theory of superconductivity, the article shows: (1) that a superconducting device cannot distinguish between rotation and an applied magnetic field; (2) that a superconducting device surrounded by a co-rotating superconducting shield cannot detect rotation. The term `superconducting gyroscope` in this article refers only to a device whose working principle is the response of the superconductor itself to rotation, not to any device in which superconducting electronic components are used to detect some other effect. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}},
doi = {10.1063/1.366451},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 11,
volume = 82,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Mon Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}