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Title: Unorthodox fractionation in the treatment of head and neck tumors. [Palliative effectiveness and morbidity]

Abstract

A group of 95 patients with advanced squamous carcinomas of the head and neck area received split-course radiotherapy with palliative intent. The fractionation scheme comprised three separate courses, 2 to 3 weeks apart. During the first course, the patients received 800 rad on the first day and 400 rad on the second and third days. The second and third courses consisted of 2000 rad given in five treatments. Fields were smaller than those used in patients who are treated radically. The spinal cord and larynx were shielded whenever possible. Although meaningful palliation was observed in the majority of patients, the observed local control rate was low. Acute radiation related morbidity was mild to moderate in most cases. Late sequelae appear acceptable in a few long term survivors whose small number, however, precludes meaningful conclusions. Split-course irradiation using a large priming dose appears to be an effective means of palliation which can be achieved with a greatly reduced number of fractions and with acceptable treatment related morbidity. However, the advantage of this type of fravctionation in achieving local tumor control could not be substantiated.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA
OSTI Identifier:
5643850
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol. Phys.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CAROTID ARTERIES; DELAYED RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATION EFFECTS; EDEMA; RADIOINDUCTION; INFLAMMATION; LARYNX; MALFORMATIONS; MUCOUS MEMBRANES; RADIOTHERAPY; SIDE EFFECTS; COBALT 60; ELECTRONS; GAMMA RADIATION; HEAD; LOCAL IRRADIATION; NECK; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; VAN DE GRAAFF ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; ARTERIES; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; BLOOD VESSELS; BODY; BODY AREAS; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; COBALT ISOTOPES; DISEASES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELECTROSTATIC ACCELERATORS; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; FERMIONS; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; INTERNAL CONVERSION RADIOISOTOPES; IONIZING RADIATIONS; IRRADIATION; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; LEPTONS; MEDICINE; MINUTES LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; NUCLEI; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; ORGANS; PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES; RADIATIONS; RADIOISOTOPES; RADIOLOGY; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; SYMPTOMS; THERAPY; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 560151* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man; 550603 - Medicine- External Radiation in Therapy- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Pilepich, M.V., Munzenrider, J.E., and Rene, J.B. Unorthodox fractionation in the treatment of head and neck tumors. [Palliative effectiveness and morbidity]. United States: N. p., 1979. Web. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(79)90727-2.
Pilepich, M.V., Munzenrider, J.E., & Rene, J.B. Unorthodox fractionation in the treatment of head and neck tumors. [Palliative effectiveness and morbidity]. United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(79)90727-2.
Pilepich, M.V., Munzenrider, J.E., and Rene, J.B. Thu . "Unorthodox fractionation in the treatment of head and neck tumors. [Palliative effectiveness and morbidity]". United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(79)90727-2.
@article{osti_5643850,
title = {Unorthodox fractionation in the treatment of head and neck tumors. [Palliative effectiveness and morbidity]},
author = {Pilepich, M.V. and Munzenrider, J.E. and Rene, J.B.},
abstractNote = {A group of 95 patients with advanced squamous carcinomas of the head and neck area received split-course radiotherapy with palliative intent. The fractionation scheme comprised three separate courses, 2 to 3 weeks apart. During the first course, the patients received 800 rad on the first day and 400 rad on the second and third days. The second and third courses consisted of 2000 rad given in five treatments. Fields were smaller than those used in patients who are treated radically. The spinal cord and larynx were shielded whenever possible. Although meaningful palliation was observed in the majority of patients, the observed local control rate was low. Acute radiation related morbidity was mild to moderate in most cases. Late sequelae appear acceptable in a few long term survivors whose small number, however, precludes meaningful conclusions. Split-course irradiation using a large priming dose appears to be an effective means of palliation which can be achieved with a greatly reduced number of fractions and with acceptable treatment related morbidity. However, the advantage of this type of fravctionation in achieving local tumor control could not be substantiated.},
doi = {10.1016/0360-3016(79)90727-2},
journal = {Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol. Phys.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 5:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}