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Title: Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells

Abstract

The authors describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cylcosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action.

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. (National Inst. of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))
  2. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5641168
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Molecular and Cellular Biology; (USA); Journal Volume: 9:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; GENE REGULATION; LYMPHOCYTES; GENE AMPLIFICATION; MITOGENS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; CLASSIFICATION; CYCLOHEXIMIDE; DNA-CLONING; FIBROBLASTS; IMMUNOSUPPRESSION; IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE DRUGS; SENSITIVITY; ANIMAL CELLS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; ANTIBIOTICS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY FLUIDS; CLONING; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DNA HYBRIDIZATION; DRUGS; FUNGICIDES; HYBRIDIZATION; LEUKOCYTES; MATERIALS; PESTICIDES; SOMATIC CELLS; 550400* - Genetics; 550300 - Cytology; 560300 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Zipfel, P.F., Siebenlist, U., Irving, S.G., and Kelly, K. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.1128/MCB.9.3.1041.
Zipfel, P.F., Siebenlist, U., Irving, S.G., & Kelly, K. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells. United States. doi:10.1128/MCB.9.3.1041.
Zipfel, P.F., Siebenlist, U., Irving, S.G., and Kelly, K. Wed . "Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells". United States. doi:10.1128/MCB.9.3.1041.
@article{osti_5641168,
title = {Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells},
author = {Zipfel, P.F. and Siebenlist, U. and Irving, S.G. and Kelly, K.},
abstractNote = {The authors describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cylcosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action.},
doi = {10.1128/MCB.9.3.1041},
journal = {Molecular and Cellular Biology; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 9:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}
  • Prostatic cancer typically produces osteoblastic metastases which are not attended by marrow fibrosis. In the present study we sought to test the hypothesis that prostatic cancer cells produce factor(s) which act selectively on human osteoblasts. Such a paracrine mechanism would explain the observed increase in osteoblasts, unaccompanied by an increase in marrow fibroblasts. To test this hypothesis we investigated the mitogenic activity released by the human prostatic tumor cell line, PC3. PC3 cells have been reported previously to produce mitogenic activity for cells that was relatively specific for rat osteoblasts compared to rat fibroblasts. However, the effects of this activitymore » on human cells has not been examined previously. PC3-conditioned medium (CM) (5-50 micrograms CM protein/ml) stimulated human osteoblast proliferation by 200-950% yet did not stimulate human fibroblast proliferation ((3H)thymidine incorporation). PC3 CM also increased cell numbers in human osteoblast but not fibroblast cell cultures. To determine whether the osteoblast-specific mitogenic activity could be attributed to known bone growth factors, specific assays for these growth factors were performed. PC3 CM contained 10 pg insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I, less than 2 pg IGF II, 54 pg basic fibroblast growth factor, and 16 pg transforming growth factor beta/microgram CM protein. None of these growth factors alone or in combination could account for the observed osteoblast-specific PC3 cell-derived mitogenic activity. Furthermore, when 5 micrograms/ml PC3 CM was tested in combination with maximally effective concentrations of either basic fibroblast growth factor, IGF I, IGF II, or transforming growth factor beta, it produced an additive effect suggesting that PC3 CM stimulates osteoblast proliferation by a mechanism independent of these bone mitogens.« less
  • The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that promoted contact (Rock and Roll experiments) does not increase themore » efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation.« less
  • A water-soluble, proteinaceous preparation derived from the cell walls of Salmonella typhimurium Re mutants has recently been tested in this laboratory for its ability to act as a mitogen for rat lymphocytes. This preparation (STM) has been found to be a potent simulator of B lymphocyte proliferation, as measured both by /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation and by cell cycle analysis performed with flow cytofluorometry. STM stimulates approximately 50% of rat B cells to enter cycle. Previous investigations by others have shown that at least two sets of signals are required for B cell differentiation; (a) proliferation signals that may consist ofmore » both a stimulator of B cell conversion from G/sub 0/ to G/sub 1/ and growth factors, and (b) differentiation signals that probably include at least two B cell differentiation factors (BCDF). When STM was tested in a differentiation system it did not drive purified B cells to differentiate to PFC, either alone or when supplemented with a supernatant from concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells (CAS). However, when both CAS and dextran sulfate (DXS) were supplied to the STM-stimulated cells, a large number of PFC resulted. DXT does not act by stimulating an additional, CAS-responsive B cell subset, since it has only a marginal effect upon /sup 3/H-TdR uptake and does not increase the number of B cells in cycle when used together with STM. The authors that the two agents may be acting sequentially: STM stimulates the B cells to proliferate, and DXS drives the proliferating cells to become responsive to CAS. This suggests that the signals for B cell differentiation must consist of at least three activities: a trigger to stimulate the cells to proliferate, a factor to drive the cells to a BCDF-responsive state, and a BCDF that can drive the cells to secrete antibody.« less
  • Exposure of Jurkat T cells to mollugin (15-30 muM), purified from the roots of Rubia cordifolia L., caused cytotoxicity and apoptotic DNA fragmentation along with mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, mitochondrial cytochrome c release, phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), activation of caspase-12, -9, -7, -3, and -8, cleavage of FLIP and Bid, and PARP degradation, without accompanying necrosis. While these mollugin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptotic events including activation of caspase-8 and mitochondria-dependent activation of caspase cascade were completely prevented by overexpression of Bcl-xL, the activation of JNK and caspase-12 was prevented to much lesser extent. Pretreatment of the cells with themore » pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk), the caspase-9 inhibitor (z-LEHD-fmk), the caspase-3 inhibitor (z-DEVD-fmk) or the caspase-12 inhibitor (z-ATAD-fmk) at the minimal concentration to prevent mollugin-induced apoptosis appeared to completely block the activation of caspase-7 and -8, and PARP degradation, but failed to block the activation of caspase-9 and -3 with allowing a slight enhancement in the level of JNK phosphorylation. Both FADD-positive wild-type Jurkat clone A3 and FADD-deficient Jurkat clone I2.1 exhibited a similar susceptibility to the cytotoxicity of mollugin, excluding involvement of Fas/FasL system in triggering mollugin-induced apoptosis. Normal peripheral T cells were more refractory to the cytotoxicity of mollugin than were Jurkat T cells. These results demonstrated that mollugin-induced cytotoxicity in Jurkat T cells was mainly attributable to apoptosis provoked via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated activation of JNK and caspase-12, and subsequent mitochondria-dependent activation of caspase-9 and -3, leading to activation of caspase-7 and -8, which could be regulated by Bcl-xL.« less
  • The NH2-terminal cleavage peptide of procalcitonin (N-proCT) recently was reported to be a bone cell mitogen. The authors have investigated the effect of N-proCT on the proliferation of normal human cells that have the phenotype of mature osteoblasts (hOB cells). N-proCT treatment for 24, 48, or 96 h in concentrations from 1 nM to 1 microM did not significantly increase (3H)thymidine uptake (means ranged from -19% to 38% of control, no significant differences) in hOB cells (6-10 cell strains per experiment) plated at four different densities. However, the hOB cells responded significantly to treatment with transforming growth factor {beta} (3more » ng/ml), bovine insulin (300 micrograms/ml), or 30% fetal calf serum, which were included in all experiments as positive controls. The (3H)thymidine uptake data were confirmed in a direct cell count experiment tested at 96 h. Thus they data do not support the hypothesis that N-proCT is a potent mitogen for normal human osteoblasts.« less