skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Regulatory impact analysis: Benefits and costs of proposed National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for inorganic chemicals. Phase 2, March 1989

Abstract

National Primary Drinking Water Regulations are proposed for 30 synthetic organic chemicals, termed the SOCs. The document presents an analysis of the projected national costs and benefits associated with the proposed regulations in compliance with Executive Order 12291. It also includes an analysis of cost impacts on small water systems in compliance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The 30 SOCs fall into three groups. For a group of three 'miscellaneous' contaminants (acrylamide, epichlorohydrin, and PCBs), it is simply not possible to estimate occurrence due to a lack of data. Total national costs and benefits for all three are not anticipated to be very significant.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Miller (Wade) Associates, Inc., Arlington, VA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
5631762
Report Number(s):
PB-89-192397/XAB
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DRINKING WATER; INORGANIC COMPOUNDS; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; WATER QUALITY; POLLUTION REGULATIONS; WATER TREATMENT; COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS; COST ESTIMATION; REGULATIONS; CONTROL; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION CONTROL; WATER 520600* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Regulations -- (-1989); 290300 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety

Citation Formats

Not Available. Regulatory impact analysis: Benefits and costs of proposed National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for inorganic chemicals. Phase 2, March 1989. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Not Available. Regulatory impact analysis: Benefits and costs of proposed National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for inorganic chemicals. Phase 2, March 1989. United States.
Not Available. 1989. "Regulatory impact analysis: Benefits and costs of proposed National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for inorganic chemicals. Phase 2, March 1989". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5631762,
title = {Regulatory impact analysis: Benefits and costs of proposed National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for inorganic chemicals. Phase 2, March 1989},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {National Primary Drinking Water Regulations are proposed for 30 synthetic organic chemicals, termed the SOCs. The document presents an analysis of the projected national costs and benefits associated with the proposed regulations in compliance with Executive Order 12291. It also includes an analysis of cost impacts on small water systems in compliance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The 30 SOCs fall into three groups. For a group of three 'miscellaneous' contaminants (acrylamide, epichlorohydrin, and PCBs), it is simply not possible to estimate occurrence due to a lack of data. Total national costs and benefits for all three are not anticipated to be very significant.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 3
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • This report contains an analysis of the costs and benefits of controlling inorganic chemical contaminants (IOCs) in drinking water through the promulgation of regulations for maximum contaminant level goals (MCLGs) and maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). The regulatory impact analysis (RIA) was prepared in accordance with Executive Order 12291 which requires that the costs and benefits of all major rules be examined and compared. The major topical areas covered in the RIA are as follows: Problem definition; Market imperfections, the need for federal regulation, and consideration of regulatory alternatives; Assessment of total costs; Assessment of benefits; Regulatory flexibility and paperwork reductionmore » analyses; and a summary of costs and benefits.« less
  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), under the requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act Section 1401 and 1412, P.L. 99-339, as amended in 1986, has proposed a National Primary Drinking Water Regulation (NPDWR) pertaining to the contamination of public-water systems by inorganic chemical contaminants. The proposed IOCs Rule includes information collection requirements for eight inorganic chemicals -- asbestos, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, nitrate, nitrite, and selenium. The information collection request analyzes the information burden imposed on public-water systems and States as a result of the regulation. EPA is proposing only to regulate source-related inorganics under this rule, as opposed tomore » inorganics which predominately occur as corrosion by-products and naturally occurring copper and lead are analyzed in the RIA and ICR for lead and corrosion by-products. Note also that EPA has already promulgated a NPDWR for fluoride.« less
  • The regulatory impact analysis (RIA) was prepared in accordance with Executive Order 12291, which requires that costs and benefits of all major rules be examined and compared. The document also includes an analysis of costs on small water systems as required by the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The document includes the revision of all analysis conducted and summarized in the 1988 draft, as well as additional analysis performed. Topical areas covered in the RIA are problem definition, market imperfections and consideration of regulatory alternatives, assessment of total National costs, assessment of benefits, summary of costs and benefits, and regulatory flexibility andmore » paperwork reduction analysis.« less
  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for 38 inorganic and synthetic organic chemicals on January 30, 1991 and July 1, 1991. Collectively, these two rulemakings are referred to as the Phase II Rule. The following packet of materials summarizes the Phase II Rule and is intended for use by EPA regional officials, state and water system personnel. The first section of the package consists of a regulatory overview; the second section consists of a series of 14 fact sheets which describe specific aspects of the rule (i.e., monitoring and analytical requirements, state primary conditions, publicmore » notification, treatment options, etc.); and the third section consists of contaminant-specific data sheets. The various components of the package have been designed to be used individually or as part of the larger package.« less
  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), under the requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act (Section 1401 and 1412, P.L. 99-339, as amended in 1986), has proposed National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWR) pertaining to the contamination of public water systems by synthetic organic chemical (SOCs) contaminants. The proposed regulations require the collection of information by public water systems, states, and the EPA. Information collection requirements include monitoring, reporting, and recordkeeping activities that are discussed in this Information Collection Requests (ICR) document.